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57274493 No.57274493 [Reply] [Original] [4plebs] [archived.moe]

How do you make an interesting RP character if you're a boring person?

>> No.57274510

>>57274493
Copy an interesting character from a piece of fiction you like. Your playing a game, not writing Shakespeare.

>> No.57274557

>>57274493
By not playing self-insert.

>>57274510
>Copy an interesting character from a piece of fiction you like
>How to be That Guy in one simple step! His players hate him! Read this one phenomenal advice...

>> No.57274638

>>57274557
>By not playing self-insert.
Not advice.

>>57274557
>>How to be That Guy in one simple step! His players hate him! Read this one phenomenal advice...

"That guy" is an aspect of behavior at the table. Nobody gives a shit about your "creativity" or special snowflake. They want to play the fucking game and have fun.

>> No.57274740
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57274740

>>57274638
But they don't want to play it with Movie!Gimli #57274638 or Not!Drizzt #83647275, you fucking imbecile.
Picking characters from fiction, especially blatantly, is the easiest way of getting weird looks from people and in the end playing very boring, very crappy rendetion of said character. You would know, if you ever played a single session of any TTRPG in your entire fucking life.

>> No.57274951

>>57274740
As apposed to my totally original "idea' that isn't the exact same rip off anyway just under a different name? Choose an archetype and make the character up as you go. People want to play the game, not sit around hearing some faggot's three hundred page long back story.

Until the plot begins, your just a human warrior from the south. A man from the east. A dwarf from the great under city. If you need a design or template, then use a fictional character with the serial numbers filed off until you can grow them into something more original. Overly complex character origin stories ruin every session they're used in 95% of the time. Let the DM worry about writing up stupidly long character histories.

>> No.57275020

>>57274951
>Let the DM worry about writing up stupidly long character histories
>NPCs who are going to appear occasionally should have fully fleshed out personalities, problems, beliefs and motivations
>The PCs, who are the main focus of the game, shouldn't

>> No.57275284

>>57275020
>>NPCs who are going to appear occasionally should have fully fleshed out personalities, problems, beliefs and motivations
Yeah, because they're props that form the framework of the game. More depth to them doesn't slow the game down, it just gives more options of interaction.

>>57275020
>>Let the DM worry about writing up stupidly long character histories
Seeing how they're making the setting and adventure. You don't have to worry about "contradictions."

>>57275020
>>The PCs, who are the main focus of the game, shouldn't
PC's are the main interactive element of the game. They are your players literal eyes and ears. Everything they do should be in the moment, not the past. Because now is when the game is taking place. As you play their stories are created. Creating long back stories front loads the game with a load of bullshit that no one cares about and slows the experience into a painful crawl.

>> No.57275505

>>57275284
I'm playing a wfrp game of Terror in Talabehim at the moment, each player had a backstory reason for being there, and each engaged in their personal story and gained rewards for achieving their original objective during the main story.

Backstory can give characters a guiding purpose beyond simply being the player. I know full well when I got my girlfriend into our games she struggled at creating a character, but a quick roll on the backstory table and she was suddenly a runaway teenage girl, daughter of a family of innkeepers, who became a pirate for a life of adventure to escape her background as a cook in their Wolfenburg kitchens.

To say they shouldnt have backstory is ignoring a bit part of character creation and giving them direction and purpose beyond reacting to what is immediately in front of them.

>> No.57276044

>>57275505
>but a quick roll on the backstory table and she was suddenly a runaway teenage girl, daughter of a family of innkeepers, who became a pirate for a life of adventure to escape her background as a cook in their Wolfenburg kitchens.

Yeah, we are on the same page. I just think you were misunderstanding me (assuming your the same person). I'm not saying there doesn't need to be back stories. I'm saying it needs to be simple, or at the very least, short. Losing the "moment" is one of the most common mistakes people make when playing RPG's.

>> No.57276101

>>57276044
Different person, but glad we agree. My group tends to lose the moment more by buying takeaways or getting caught up on Facebook whilst it's not their turn than delving into their backstory.

>> No.57276532
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57276532

>always end up as a background character everyone else ignores

>> No.57276537

>>57276101
A good rule of thumb is ditching the cells and laptops outside of a designated reference guy. Anybody caught violating this rule must cover the food costs in their shame!

>> No.57276743

>>57274510
This, but pick something the rest of the table isn't likely to know. Unless they're cool with it. It worked for Nubby Nubs so it might work for you. Once youre comfirtable with it then over time and over a few characters you can change certain aspects of the character until you're creating interesting characters. That's how I did it.

>> No.57276790

Try just throwing in a short two sentence backstory in and a couple of traits your character lives by and evolve them as the story goes on. For all the shit tg seems to give 5e it did this pretty well.

>> No.57277100
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57277100

>>57274493
Listen to what happens at the table, respond to the behaviour other characters give you and let your character learn and be affected by the world. The most interested characters are the ones rooted to the world and the actions of the story. They are the ones that can react, grow and change. No matter where you start from as long as you perceive, make decisions based on your perceptions and behave based on your decisions your character will become interesting.

Other than that, give them something to want, give them something to loose and something to hide. Simplicity is good, something achievable is good. To make things extra interesting remember: Many people don't know their own minds. We always can't identify or articulate our motivations. Most tragic heroes have some fault or misunderstanding within themselves or something they refuse to acknowledge.

Backstory and chosen qualities are useful but really it comes down to what happens in the moment. A character played vigorously and sincerely will always be better than an idea with twelve pages of backstory that has to be consulted moment to moment. A character backstory should give the characters abilities and motivations context and tell how the character wound up here and now with the party. Anything more than that is just gak.


But ultimately:
>Pay attention and work off others, give them stuff to work off of
>Engage with your surroundings
>Learn from your adventures
>Let yourself be effected
>Let yourself have something to gain and something to loose (apathy on it's own is safe but also boring)

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