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[ERROR] No.20497534 [DELETED]  [Reply] [Original] [4plebs] [archived.moe]

What's the best way to do a skill system for D&D? How detailed do you think it should be? What sort of things should it cover? How should your skills grow (if at all) as you gain levels?

>> No.20497699

>>20497534
I thought it might be interesting to examine the nonweapon proficiencies from 2e and what I think is wrong with them. Why? Because a lot of people are probably unfamiliar with them, which means that they might gain some insight into D&D's skill evolution, and shit is less likely to quickly devolve into an edition war.

Problem 1: shit doesn't cost what it's worth. Pottery costs the same as riding or direction sense, and it's harder to pull off.

Problem 2: Details that don't mean enough to make it worthwhile. Warriors and Rogues start with 3 NWPs while Wizards and Priests start with 4. Warriors, Priests and Wizards gain a new one every 3 levels, while Rogues gain a new one every 4. Everybody's shit is close enough that you might as well just use the same progression for everybody and simplify shit. You start with 4 and gain one every 3.

Problem 3: Details that don't mean enough to make it worthwhile, part 2. All the +1 and -1 check modifiers could easily be rounded to 0. Honestly, with a possible few exceptions, everything could just be 0. I've never had anybody who could predict what the modifiers were based on intuition, logic or anything other than reading over them and remember what they'd read. Is there a good reason why your pottery check is at -3 but your direction sense gets a +1? Retain a +2 or -2 modifier for a few select proficiences and leave everything else at 0.

Problem 4: Spending 2 NWP slots is a big deal, and not all the 2-slot proficiencies are worth it.

>> No.20497768

From what I saw, I think 4e had approximately the right number of skills, and I like the idea that you don't have to constantly fiddle with skill points. It seems roughly the appropriate level of complexity for D&D, which isn't a skill-based game. I did kind of like the the way craft, knowledge and profession worked in 3e though, as it gave you the ability to shape your character outside of narrow confines. Adding in the option to take something like that either at a reduced cost (2 for 1) or merely as a bonus (everybody gets 1 or 2 automatically) would be good.

>> No.20497797

>>20497699
Almost forgot: purchasing a NWP from outside your class is prohibitively expensive. I'd be tempted to double people's points and have class NWP cost 2 and nonclass ones cost 3.

>> No.20497844

>>20497534
Big, scary chart a completely optional read BTW.

>> No.20497877

>>20497534
Don't drop it into minutiae like Baking, Pottery, and shit like that. Only have skills that are GOING TO BE USEFUL REGULARLY.

>> No.20497902

>>20497877
That's what I'm saying. Or if you have shit like baking and pottery have it separate from the normal skills. Basically, have an optional list of fairly useless things (because they're so specific and/or rarely applicable in an adventure game) that people can choose one of to add some color to their character.

>> No.20497983

>>20497699
>Pottery costs the same as riding
Which is why its Dex -2 insteadof Wis +3.

>Warriors and Rogues start with 3 NWPs while Wizards and Priests start with 4. Warriors, Priests and Wizards gain a new one every 3 levels, while Rogues gain a new one every 4. Everybody's shit is close enough that you might as well just use the same progression for everybody and simplify shit. You start with 4 and gain one every 3.
Warriors get more Weapon Proficiencies and Rogues get their rogue abilities. You also get extra NWP slots based on your Intelligence score, so a one slot variation is also relatively small.

>All the +1 and -1 check modifiers could easily be rounded to 0. Honestly, with a possible few exceptions, everything could just be 0.
Except for the whole "riding is the same as pottery" thing.

>Is there a good reason why your pottery check is at -3 but your direction sense gets a +1?
Yes, one is harder than the other. But, rather than say "it costs a massive investment in resources to be a potter," you can take pottery for background/fluff value without seriously harming your character's stock of more frequently useful abilities.

Read the book, which explains all of this, before you comment on this.

>> No.20498305

>>20497902
So have categories of Domestic/Profession Training, and Skills as something separate. That way people can have Domestic Training: Animal Husbandry, and they can still have extra skill points for useful stuff like Survival, Athletics or Occult. NWoD has lots of skills and doesn't worry about professions within that (though Hunter adds the actual Profession stat, which can be fun to play around with).

>> No.20499243

I always thought it would be best to level up the skills you use.
You fight with a sword, every once in a while your skill goes up.
You like to sneak around, every once in a while you get even sneakier.
You read history books, etc, ad infinitum.

The arbitrary assigning of points while simpler is just frustrating and at least with natural progression the skills you actually use would always improve.

This way you could have as many skills or as few as you wanted. Assign a modifier, that makes sense, and when an applicable check comes up you apply it. Trying to work an obsolete system is tedious.

>> No.20499293

>>20499243
>I always thought it would be best to level up the skills you use.
I prefer the static skills of AD&D. Meaning your skill as a potter has little to nothing to do with your skill as a swordsman. Skill leveling is ridiculous.

>> No.20499456

>>20499243
>The arbitrary assigning of points while simpler is just frustrating and at least with natural progression the skills you actually use would always improve.

Elder Scroll style is it?

Can't remeber what table top is was but there was this system that had you write which skills you used, and upon a successful check (i think) you got a 1 point of "Skill experience" after you got enough S.Exp that equaled your current rank it leveled up. So 1 rank 1 S.Exp you went to level 2.

It encouraged you to keep trying the skills your were good at, but at later levels it was a little difficult to level up a new skill.

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