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/sci/ - Science & Math


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8682065 No.8682065 [Reply] [Original] [archived.moe]

So does anyone else forgot basic stuff that you studied in undergrad or is it just me?

The other day I couldn't set up a basic calc proof because the last time I saw one was decades ago. I just don't encounter it a lot in my field of study. Is this the drawback of specialization of the drawback of being me?

Thanks.

>> No.8682144

>>8682065
Do you really think that mathematicians remember stuff from undergrad? They specialize in grad school and that's all they know about. Even fucking engineers don't remember their calculus classes, and YES, this is for the smart people too that had really good grades and gave a shit about the subject. Nobody remembers all of that shit. You just need to UNDERSTAND it so you can move onto something more complicated/specific or whatever. This is a pretty bad misconception that probably keeps a lot of people out of math, which is a drag.

>> No.8682147

>>8682065

You remember what you need, you remind yourself of everything else if you ever run into it again and need it.

>> No.8682213

>>8682144
I just felt kind of insecure when I couldn't set up the proof by myself. I thought I could because it's very basic stuff relative to what I do daily but I was struggling.
But you're right, it's more important to understand than to simply memorize. Once I saw the proof, I could follow and understand it quickly. I just felt kinda "mediocre" for not being able to set up the proof myself. Maybe I just put too much (unrealistic) pressure on myself.

Thanks for your reply.

>> No.8682243

I sucked as a math student, but compensated by learning the derivation from first principles of just about all my math.

That means that, while I stumble on the problems I haven't seen in a while, I can still reinvent the wheel and eventually come up with a solution without having to check the internet.

However, if I really have a problem, it doesn't always work to go to the computer. They don't teach it like I learned it.

As for forgetting, that is how your mind works. It is not how you made up the story that is remembered, but the story itself. Everything else is culled. The pathways and connections that lead to a story that works are not only streamlined, but the stray pathways and connections are trimmed.

>> No.8682253

>>8682213
the only people that need to really memorize this stuff are professors who are teaching a class in it, maybe.

>> No.8682261

>>8682065
nobody remembers that shit. the point is, you know where to look up the information and you know how to quickly absorb, synthesize, and apply things you see out of the book.

this is literally why humans invented writing.

>> No.8682284
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8682284

>set up a basic calc proof
Why would you need a proof for something in calc anyway lol.
It's a useless information.
You simply need to know what are derivatives, limits, integrals, how to take them and that's it.

>> No.8682292

>>8682243
Good point. You're right, I'm probably being insecure. I just felt bad after realizing I couldn't do it.


>>8682253
So if I were to approach a fellow grad student and ask him to prove some concept in Calc and he probably couldn't do it without looking it up? Or should he be able to do it on the spot?


>>8682261
This is what I thought but I assumed other people on the same level could just set derive it without having to look it up.


>>8682284
>Why would you need a proof for something in calc anyway lol.


I don't. At least in my field. But it was sort of embarrassing not being able to do it.

>> No.8682583

>>8682292
>So if I were to approach a fellow grad student and ask him to prove some concept in Calc and he probably couldn't do it without looking it up? Or should he be able to do it on the spot?

He might be familiar with it, but that's about it.

>> No.8682684

>>8682261
>nobody remembers that shit. the point is, you know where to look up the information and you know how to quickly absorb, synthesize, and apply things you see out of the book.

CS would be even more hellish if I had to memorize most of some guy's mindless syntax. I merely read up on all the features--a few times--and then I can recall they exist when I need their functionality: then i lookup the method sig syntax on help. Simple.

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