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10886255 No.10886255 [Reply] [Original] [archived.moe]

I used to think a speaker cone moves like the waveform of the voltage being applied to the coil, ie high positive or negative voltage = speaker cone position is inwards or outwards.

I realised this is wrong... the voltage applied to the coil is proportional to the force being applied to the speaker cone, not the cone's position. The cone moves like the derivative function of the voltage waveform applied to the coil, ie high positive or negative voltage = high positive or negative movement of speaker cone.

Then I realised this is wrong too. The voltage applied to the coil is proportional to the force being applied to the speaker cone, which is proportional to the acceleration of the speaker cone by F=ma. The cone moves in the double derivative function of the voltage waveform applied to the coil, ie high positive or negative voltage = high positive or negative acceleration of speaker cone.

Then I realised this won't happen... the effect of air resistance on a speaker cone will be significant, probably more significant than the inertia of the cone.

>> No.10886631

>>10886255
nah, if the instantaneous circuit can be approximated as a constant-voltage source and a resistor, then the amperage will increase to counteract the force of the air so you were probably right the second time

>> No.10887099

>>10886255
>Then I realised this won't happen... the effect of air resistance on a speaker cone will be significant, probably more significant than the inertia of the cone.

like this guy said >>10886631 you need to look at it not just from the perpective of voltage but the current is the important factor in "voicecoils" and loudspeakers in general.

current is what will actually make the cone move againts the air resistance. always rmember that in the real world is impossible to separate current from voltage you cant isolate one from the other.

loudspeakers are considered "current devices" like electric motors and other type of actuators like relays etc

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