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/sci/ - Science & Math


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10718383 No.10718383 [Reply] [Original] [archived.moe]

What kind of glass is used to withstand the thermal shock of glassware glassware ? Not like lids on a pot of boiling water, but the front windows of ovens / toaster ovens. What kind of glass are they ? I am more impressed by glass/ceramic stovetops , since they can have one burner on the highest setting while the other burners remain off. How does this work ?

>> No.10718384

>>10718383
>glassware glassware

shit

>> No.10718388

I have boiled a pot of water, and water splashed out onto the hot surface of the glass stovetop yet it didn't crack. Is this due to the glass? Or was I just lucky ?

>> No.10718396

glassware can be made into alloys like metals can, check the oven or dish manual/manufacturer if you want to know whatever specific one yours use

this is why corningware and pyrex are expensive as they are patented materials

>> No.10718407

>>10718396
I just think it's nuts that ceramic/glass can withstand huge thermal shock without cracking. I feel that even If i set my stove to the highest setting, waited 20 minutes for it to heat up , and then pressed an ice cube into the middle of the glass burner it would probably not crack.

>> No.10718872

https://en.wikipedia.org/wiki/Borosilicate_glass
this is so well known that op has to be willfully ignorant, what a garbage thread

>> No.10719643

>>10718383
Baker irl and I've always though the same.

>>10718407
It probably wouldn't. You'd definitely burn your hand though.

>>10718872
Shut up nerd give me your lunch money or it's swirly time

>> No.10719726

>>10718872
>While more resistant to thermal shock than other types of glass, borosilicate glass can still crack or shatter when subjected to rapid or uneven temperature variations.

>Allowing high maximum temperatures of typically about 500 °C (932 °F)

That isn't what i'm talking about , there are glass/ceramic stovetops that are much more impressive than that

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