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>> No.6310849 [View]
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6310849

>>6310766
Here's a way to implement it:

If the increment i in probability is constants, then given it must reach exactly 1 at one points, there is a maximal number M of kills you can go without reward. And then M*i=1, i.e. the increment is 1/M each kill. The probability to get a reward R after K kills is hence K/M.

Let's store the current number of kills K and the rewards R got so far in a vector indexed by (K,R), where K runs from 0 to M and R runs from 0 to how long you play t.

We have
(K,R) --> (0,R+1)
has probability K/M

and no reward
(K,R) --> (K+1,R)
has hence probability 1-K/M.

If you want to see the probability for R rewards after T time steps, use these probabilies to set up the (M*t) times (M*t) transition matrix

http://en.wikipedia.org/wiki/Transition_matrix#Example:_the_cat_and_mouse

Then you can get the probabilities by choosing some value R and summing over the K's of the vector. (Since the matrix is so sparse, you can do it on paper, probably)

>> No.6016329 [View]
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6016329

Combinatorically, there 16 functions which take two inputs and give up to two different ouputs, see

https://en.wikipedia.org/wiki/Truth_function#Table_of_binary_truth_functions

The material implication you refer to is one of them.
For practical, as well as for historical reasons, this operation is part of the standard presentation of classical propositional logic - but one doesn't have to adopt it.
Moreover, you're right is feeling uneasy regarding to what extend the material implication really captures the intuitive "if then" relation. Many more complicated logics are formed around extending this, e.g.
https://en.wikipedia.org/wiki/Relevant_logic

That being said, evidently it works for doing formal mathematics and these two questions on math stackexchange ask exactly your question:

http://math.stackexchange.com/questions/38713/help-to-understand-material-implication

http://math.stackexchange.com/questions/232309/how-to-interpret-material-conditional-and-explain-it-to-freshmen

>> No.4307319 [View]
File: 652 KB, 1920x1080, EmmaStoneGravity.jpg [View same] [iqdb] [saucenao] [google] [report]
4307319

>>4307231
rewrite the text in a readable way, it's terrible sorry

>> No.4295121 [View]
File: 652 KB, 1920x1080, EmmaStoneGravity.jpg [View same] [iqdb] [saucenao] [google] [report]
4295121

What is there no information about HCCO on the web?

What is it called and where is it relevant?



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