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667543 No.667543 [Reply] [Original]

Okay, so is Shakespeare really THE greatest? I personally can't feel justified saying so, what I've read of his was amazing but I haven't read enough of him or enough literature in general to say with confidence.

I feel like the majority of these 'critics' who claim he's the greatest are english monoglots who feel satisfied knowing the greatest author of all time wrote in their language, thus reinforcing the English world hegemony. Are there many critics/authors of other languages who view Shakespeare as the greatest?

Perhaps once we settle the matter we can move on to the dubious question of Shakespeare authorship...but I digress.
; )

Anyway, discuss

>> No.667550

I dont like you

>> No.667552

*cough*


(cough echoes loudly)

>> No.667558
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667558

A challenger appears!

>> No.667561

>>667558
more like Tl;drstoy!

>> No.667562

>>667558
who dat

>> No.667573
File: 68 KB, 348x599, 348px-Claudius_(M.A.N._Madrid)_01.jpg [View same] [iqdb] [saucenao] [google] [report]
667573

Shakespeare criticism is by and large an index of things not worth saying about Shakespeare.

He has a massive vocabulary, a command of differing high and low styles, and most importantly there's no biography we have that could "explain" his work away. In other words, he's still a mystery in a way that Dante (who did meet Beatrice and wrote from that inspiration) or Joyce (who did meet Nora and immortalized the day she first gave him a handjob) are not. Because we figure, oh Dante or Joyce did it for a girl they loved and lost or didn't lose, or whatever.

Hence, the authorship debate. Freud thought the plays were written by the Earl of Oxford. Walt Whitman and Mark Twain believed the Bacon theory. HELEN FUCKING KELLER believed the plays were written by Francis Bacon. (See the new book by Shapiro, "Contested Will", if you doubt me.)

You want to know my theory?

One English writer gets to be the most famous writer of all time. His name? Shakespeare (or so they say).

Meanwhile, 400+ years earlier, the only Englishman ever to be elected Pope gets elected as Pope. He promptly uses his powers to give Ireland to the King of England, which says a lot about the Papacy and about Irish Catholics. What was his name?

Well, Pope Adrian IV. The only English Pope. Look it up. His real name was Breakspeare.

Obviously Shakespeare was some kind of pen name. Obviously there is a conspiracy. I just find it hilarious that it's only within the past 10 years or so that people have started to suggest (based on the "Shake-shafte" found in a Catholic recusant household during Shakespeare's lost years) that Shakespeare might have been Catholic. DUH. Joyce noticed this, Antony Burgess noticed this, they both knew about Shakespeare / Breakspeare. They just had better things to write than more fapping over the supposedly greatest writer of all time.

Pic related: It's Hamlet's Uncle, the Roman who conquered Britannia and was deified there.

>> No.667596

The "authorship debate" isn't really. The only people who take that kind of thing seriously are the type that are also investigating the NWO conspiracy to take over the world. There's a metric fuckton of evidence for Shakespeare being the author AND against all the other "candidates".

>> No.667602

>>667573
>>667596
Ah, well the authorship question was sort of a failed side-joke. I'm not sure I understand the Breakspeare connection.

I like what you have to say about the lack of biography, I pray to God that when Pynchon dies any information of his life will be spared and not sold out by some loosely-related acquaintance or family member. I prefer the mystery.

>> No.667606
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667606

>>There's a metric fuckton of evidence for Shakespeare being the author AND against all the other "candidates".

Yeah yeah. Oxford died before the Tempest was written, Bacon clearly didn't write them. What if Christopher Marlowe didn't really die? What if some other body were buried and Marlowe's death was faked? It happens in Cymbeline (Cloten's headless corpse) and in Measure for Measure (Barnardine).

Marlowe is the only person with the talent to have written Shakespeare's plays. But if it was Marlowe, it would be related to some kind of conspiracy / cover-up. And we know Marlowe WAS involved in conspiracies, cover-ups, and espionage. How can you so easily rule Marlowe out? Seriously.

>> No.667610

>>667606
>What if Christopher Marlowe didn't really die?
And that's how you cross the line from a valid line of questioning to insanity.

>> No.667619
File: 53 KB, 423x317, pynchon_house.jpg [View same] [iqdb] [saucenao] [google] [report]
667619

>>I pray to God that when Pynchon dies

I pray to God that before Pynchon dies somebody will point out that the secret answer to The Crying of Lot 49 is "Torquato Tasso". Thurn & Taxis? Torquato Tasso? The image of the badger on his back? Get it?

Torquato Tasso was a famous literary artist who went mad and got locked away. In other words, Oedipa's experience of paranoia is a form of artistic madness. That's it. It's a puzzle book, just like Pale Fire expects you to work out the puzzle that the crown jewels are hidden in Kobaltana. This, incidentally, is why my good friend Tommy basically disowned Lot 49 in the preface to Slow Learner.

Again, the fact that no academic has noticed this about Pynchon---even men as bright as Edward Mendelson or Tony Tanner---shows more about the limitations of the academic mindset than anything else.

>> No.667625

>>667610
>>And that's how you cross the line from a valid line of questioning to insanity.

Well my thesis advisor at Miskatonic U, Professor Charles X Kinbote, really thinks I'm on to something.

>> No.667629

>>667619
Wait, wait. What?

Explain. I like what you're saying but, what?

>> No.667634
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667634

>>I'm not sure I understand the Breakspeare connection.

Spelling was nonstandardized. Marlowe's name is variously given as Marley, Merlin, and so on, in all documents related to his life. Meanwhile Shakespeare would appear to have been using the name "Shakeshafte" earlier in his career, before he headed to London. Maybe it's just a pen-name. Maybe he was the illegitimate child of Elizabeth I and the Duc D'Alençon. Maybe I'm Bill Murray. But no-one will ever believe me.

>> No.667640

>>667634
wait, that pope was 400 years earlier than shakespeare.
and how the fuck are you connecting that to
>Maybe he was the illegitimate child of Elizabeth I and the Duc D'Alençon
?

>> No.667643

>>667634
I believe you. Billy Murray on 4chan doesn't seem too far-fetched.

>> No.667646

>>667606

Nevermind that the only thing you are basing your argument on is your retarded judgement that Marlowe had the talent, while the real Shakespeare did not..There is a simple fact that disproves the Marlowe theory: Marlowe's comedies are shit. Unless you think the conspiracy extended so far that he deliberately wrote bad comedies under "Marlowe" and then good ones under "Shakespeare", that should be enough to quell any suspicions.

>> No.667648

>>667619
I don't recall this badger reference or Tasso in CoL 49. I thought Pynchon dismissed it because he had just written it in a hurry trying to earn a buck.

>> No.667654
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667654

>>667629
Shall I lay it out in lemmata? (That being the proper Greek plural.)
1. The "Taxis" in Thurn & Taxis is ascribed as being derived from the Italian word "Tasso" meaning "badger." Here's the passage....

"Soon he had added to his iconography the muted post horn and a dead badger with its four feet in the air (some said that the name Taxis came from the Italian tasso, badger, referring to hats of badger fur the early Bergamascan couriers wore). He began a sub rosa campaign of obstruction, terror and depredation along the Thurn and Taxis mail routes. Oedipa spent the next several days in and out of libraries and earnest discussions with Emory Bortz and Genghis Cohen". (If you don't believe me.)
2. Look up the Latin verb "torqueo, torquere". It means: to twist, turn, screw. "Torquato" is a Latin past-participle. Torquato Tasso = Turned Badger.
3. Of course "Thurn" is the German word for "tower", like the tower in Remedios Varo's painting.
4. Of course there is a famous poem about Torquato Tasso (besides Goethe's) by Shelley (Julian & Maddalo) which describe's Tasso as a madman locked away in a tower.
5. Shall I go on?

>> No.667661

>>667654
spoiler alert?

>> No.667671

>>667654
Well, fuck me. My mind has just been blown a little bit. Go on if you've got more, I'd like to hear it.

>> No.667675
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667675

>>wait, that pope was 400 years earlier than shakespeare.

Yeah, yeah. And yet...the same Pope was connected to John of Salisbury, whose work Politicraticus gives the motto (by way of Petronius) to the Globe Theatre.

I'm not making this up. I don't have a theory. I just read more widely and think in different ways from Professional Shakespehearean Scholars.

>>and how the fuck are you connecting that to

I'm not. I'm just listing facts that nobody ever bothers to adduce when they talk about Shakespeare. Read the life of Claudius in Suetonius' 12 Caesars. Remember nobody in Denmark is named Claudius in any source material given for Hamlet. Now ask yourself....why does Polonius hide behind an arras in the same way that Claudius Caesar did after Caligula's assassination? It's a visual pun that nobody in 400 years of so-called "scholarship" has pointed out.

It takes somebody like me. Bill fucking Murray.

>> No.667683

>>667675
You sound like Dan Brown or Tom Clancy or something trying to craft a ridiculous conspiracy that spans multiple generations and countries.
Also, I doubt you read more widely than most Shakespeare scholars.
A third thing,
>Shakespehearean

>> No.667692

>>Well, fuck me. My mind has just been blown a little bit. Go on if you've got more, I'd like to hear it.

Okay. Why don't you write a letter to Mr Pynchon, care of his lovely wife:

The Melanie Jackson Agency.
250 West 57th Street, Suite 1119,
New York, NY 10019

And ask this:

Dear Mr Pinecone, In your novel INHERENT VICE you mention that Doc Sportello gets a hard-on every time Ida Lupino's name is mentioned. I want to know if Doc Sportello got a hard-on while watching the film Ida directed, THE TROUBLE WITH ANGELS, starring Hayley Mills, with Rosalind Russell as the Mother Superior of a Nunnery. This film has always confused me, because Rosalind Russell earlier played Gypsy Rose Lee's mother in GYPSY, and Ida Lupino cast Gypsy Rose Lee opposite Roz Russell in The Trouble With Angels. Incidentally, I noted from those liner notes you wrote for that Lotion album that you are a bit of a Love Boat fan, Mr Pinecone. Do you think there's a connection between Hayley Mills's work in Ida Lupino's film and her work in the all-important episode of The Love Boat? After reading INHERENT VICE, I now realize Maritime Law would apply to that episode of The Love Boat, and I'm interested, Mr Pinecone, if that's what you meant. Sincerely, Oakley Hall

>> No.667695

>>667692
Why call him Pinecone?

>> No.667700

>>667619
You're on to something about Tasso but explain this some more.
>> In other words, Oedipa's experience of paranoia is a form of artistic madness. That's it. It's a puzzle book, just like Pale Fire expects you to work out the puzzle that the crown jewels are hidden in Kobaltana. This, incidentally, is why my good friend Tommy basically disowned Lot 49 in the preface to Slow Learner.

SPOILER ALERT!!!!!!!!!!!!!!!
So Oedipa's paranoia is really just madness and Inverarity wasn't trolling her hard? This way there's no ambiguity?

>> No.667701

>>Also, I doubt you read more widely than most Shakespeare scholars.

Doubt away. Do you think they've read all of Polydore Vergil's official history of England in Latin? If they have, why haven't they mentioned that you can find every historical character mentioned in Will's plays in this one volume, from Amlethus (Hamlet) to Maccabaeus (Macbeth)? Why? Because they have tenure and get lazy and don't read shit, except what other scholars publish. Go read Polydore Vergil yourself if you doubt me, buttmunch.

>>A third thing,
>>Shakespehearean

What, you've never read the fucking Waste Land? Line 128. It's called a fucking ALLUSION, buttmunch.

>> No.667704

>>667695

Why not?

>> No.667709
File: 2.73 MB, 700x2926, macbethsm.png [View same] [iqdb] [saucenao] [google] [report]
667709

It's the Shakespearean Code!

>> No.667712

>>Why call him Pinecone?

It's a highly learned allusion to René Descartes theories concerning the pineal gland, which Mr Pynchon's friend Harold Bloom will confirm relates to Francis Crick's stated thesis that a biological basis for the human soul might very well be found one day.

Also, if Hawthorne spelled it "Pyncheon" why not misspell his name? It might convince him to read such mishegaas. If he's not reading it right now.....

>> No.667717

>>667712
Can I have your email somehow? You seem a little too learned for 4chan...

Who are you?

>> No.667721

>>667543
Shakespeare is #2.
Brecht is #1.

(World's tubbiest playwrite saves humanist socialism)

>> No.667724

>>So Oedipa's paranoia is really just madness and Inverarity wasn't trolling her hard? This way there's no ambiguity?

You do realize that, among professional philatelists, an "inverse rarity" describes a type of highly desirable mis-printed stamp, right?

For the record, I don't think Oedipa's mad. I think she's just on to something, she knows she's on to something, and she can't believe nobody else notices or cares. The question is: Is there a larger conspiracy that does notice or care, or is she really an artist manqué who is suddenly realizing that there is a sort of order to the world and nobody has noticed it?

I can explain this better if you ask me about Joyce. James Joyce.

>> No.667725

>>667606
This is now my favourite conspiracy theory.

What if Marlowe is STILL ALIVE?

>> No.667727

>>Can I have your email somehow? You seem a little too learned for 4chan...

Can you figure out some way we can exchange e-mails without doing it in public like this? I'll gladly e-mail with a clever student, HOWEVER....

>>Who are you?

this, I cannot answer. But I'm very interesting if you'd like to have a sort of Turing Test conversation about world literature.

>> No.667731

>>What if Marlowe is STILL ALIVE?

I'm pretty sure he's not. But I can't tell whether he was actually a somdomite or just posing as one. Until I can figure that out, I daren't try to put together the pieces of this Master Mystery, as my good friend Harry Houdini would call it.

And if you don't want to ask me about Joyce. James Joyce. (Author of MRS. YES, the ultimate work of Irish Espionage) then ask me about Harry Houdini.

>> No.667738

This is my spam e-mail. Feel free to contact me if you wish. Trolls, do your worst.

But why dismiss such a clever and efficient novella?

>> No.667739
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667739

BTW: if I was Thomas Pynchon, or Bill Murray, or somebody else famous....would you even believe me?

Nobody believed me when I told them about that time Bill and I played Foosball with Pol Pot, although you can google it.

All Is True.

(To give the correct title of Shakespeare's or Marlowe's or somebody's last history play.)

>> No.667748

>>667739
Nicely played.

>> No.667749

>>But why dismiss such a clever and efficient novella?

I don't dismiss it. I think it's a lovely work of art, and I've read it many times. I like it better than Pynchon does, probably. However, I think it's interesting that literary critics are not capable of thinking like a professional writer, and professional writers are usually too jealous to inquire too closely into other people's success, etc.

Whereas I'm interested in learning HOW you write something like Crying of Lot 49, and yet still have nobody notice something obvious like this, even when there are books published by Pynchon specialists with titles like "A Companion to The Crying of Lot 49" or "Even More Footnotes To The Crying of Lot 49" or "James Clerk Maxwell Was Right And His Demon Is Posting On 4chan".

>> No.667762

>>667749
Well, I was referring to Pynchon dismissing it, but it seems like you should publish this before some anonymous half-wit steals your idea.

>> No.667773

WAIT DID YOU SAY YOUR BUDDY PYNCHON?

what do you mean by that?


oh, and go on about joyce

>> No.667777

Marlowe is really pretty shitty guys.

I'm pretty sure he didn't write Shakespeare's plays.

>> No.667781

>>667773
or rather, I think you mean good friend

>> No.667786
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667786

This is easily the most interesting /lit/ thread I've seen, mostly because I get an erection every time I hear Pynchon's name.

>> No.667791
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667791

>> No.667815

I think it's time to read me some Pynchon. Good thread guys, thanks to all who participated.

>> No.667860
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667860

>>667654

Shakespear was a nigger!!

>> No.667877

You love ol' Willy not for his stolen stories and common conventions of his time. You love him for his amazing handling of the English language. None can come close to what he could do with an arrangement of words.

>> No.667978

>>667762

If I published it, that would make me a literary critic.

If I give it away for free online, I call into question the authority we grant to critics, without giving it a second thought.

After all, Socrates is thought by some to be the greatest teacher of all time, and he took no fee to teach and was willing to die for the fact that he taught. Can anybody in academia say as much?

>> No.668000

>>WAIT DID YOU SAY YOUR BUDDY PYNCHON? what do you mean by that?

Tee hee. How about if I just say this....if a man got a nickel every time Harold Bloom spoke the words "my good friend Tommy Pynchon" that man would be a millionaire by now.

>> No.668003
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668003

>>oh, and go on about joyce

Oh, all I was going to say was....well, have you ever thought what it must be like to be James Joyce? Living as a poor Catholic in a country that is occupied by wealthy Protestants from an island next door? We live 100 years later now, and Protestant and Catholic are mostly just All Theists to the intellectual class, or to people who read Joyce. Yet imagine being Joyce. Imagine you hear that a Bureaucrat who works for the British Government shuffling papers to keep the Irish in their place---and if you're a Bureaucrat working for the British Civil Service in Dublin Castle, chances are you're a Protestant---has just published his first novel. And you're James Joyce and you read it and you see that this novel is full of clichés about the Wild Untamed Irish Natives of the West Coast of Ireland, and is just badly-written horseshit from beginning to end.

And you ask around to find out about the author of this book and you find out he is a Bureaucrat whose only previous published work is a manual for British Bureaucrats called "The Duties of Clerks of Petty Sessions in Ireland". And suddenly he thinks he can write a novel....

>> No.668005

And so you (James Joyce) pick up the Bureaucrat's novel, because it is set in the Wilds of Western Ireland, and it's entitled "The Snake's Pass" even though any fecking Irish Catholic knows there are no snakes in Ireland, St Patrick chased them out, so this Bureaucrat is clearly a complete incompetent.

And you read the book and you realize the heroine is named "Norah Joyce". Because she is. (Although James Joyce hadn't met Nora Barnacle yet when this badly-written novel was published.)

And then seven years later the Bureaucrat becomes world-famous for publishing a novel you probably have heard of, although it's not much better written than The Snake's Pass. It's called Dracula.

What would James Joyce do?

>> No.668015

Well, I'll tell you one thing. There's only one reference to Bram Stoker or Dracula in all of Finnegans Wake. (And you can trust me on this, I've read the whole damn thing, so you wouldn't have to.) Page 145 in the Viking edition:

"Let's root out Brimstoker and give him the thrall of our lives. It's Dracula's nightout"

And yet....Finnegans Wake is about a man who comes back from the dead. Tim Finnegan is undead, you might say. So is Dracula.

But do you think there's any chance that James Joyce HAD read The Snake's Pass by Bram Stoker the way I described it, and saw the cliché Irish stereotype heroine written by a Protestant Bureaucrat Servant of the Brutish Vempire named Norah Joyce, and thought of that when Nora Barnacle gave him a handjob on Bloomsday?

It's possible. Although nobody in the thriving Joyce industry has ever mentioned it.

Bram's brother Thornley Stoker even pops up as a character in Ulysses. So who knows?

But there, I've given you a reason to take an interest in Finnegans Wake. It might be (as Gogarty suggested) the most colossal leg-pull in literary history. Or it might just be the Catholic's response to the Protestant Dracula. After all, Dracula literally drinks blood. Which--if you believe as Catholics do in the doctrine of Transubstantiation--is exactly why Protestants are afraid of Catholics in the first place.

Yet I've never seen any of this mentioned in Joyce criticism, because Joyce critics are mostly interested in holding on to their teaching jobs rather than trying to think: What would it be like to be James Joyce?

>> No.668037

I like this thread. This is what I always imagined /lit/ would be like, before it came about, except not so one-sided. But it is rarely anything like this. Usually it is too caught up in its own pre-ordained forms, opinions, and repetitious ideas, and in that, so much like a stulticosm of Academia it almost strikes one as funny.

Thanks friend; not so much for the inspiring thoughts, but for their inspired expression. You make me want to be what I oft pretend I am.

>> No.668066

>>Thanks friend; not so much for the inspiring thoughts, but for their inspired expression. You make me want to be what I oft pretend I am.

Thank you, friend. I think we're all basically pretending. Or maybe I should say: Don't mock pretending. I just started posting here because I like getting people to think about literature in new and different ways, largely because I think about nothing but literature, and I don't even have anybody to share this kind of stuff with. I never sought to be an academic because I realized I would always be thinking about literature the way that either students (who love it) or writers (who maybe love it or maybe hate it but certainly don't feel like they have a choice) will think about it.

And I'd love it if somehow the academics of the world were forced to find out about 4chan. It might prove that the Time Magazine online poll was actually correct, and moot is the most influential man in America.

I hope it is, because then Harold Bloom could feel the anxiety of moot's influence. On that delightful note, I take my leave...

>> No.668069

The authorship debate doesn't necessarily negate a discussion of whomever wrote the plays and poems attributed to Shakespeare. If indeed they were all by one writer, then it is entirely fair to say that man is the greatest writer in the history of the English language. Some might contest Milton, others Joyce, or any number of other writers, but the volume and brilliance of Shakespeare's work is undeniable; as is his expertise with language, and not to be forgotten, the sheer entertainment of his plays.

>> No.668127

>>668066
Then fare you well.
>>668069
I think one aspect that is too often overlooked about Shgakespeare is that he's not a novelist or an epicist, he's a playwright. He could write many works because his works were shorter and more focused. He also saved time by lifting all of his plots directly from other writers, so that he could spend his creative energy on the content instead of the form.

I'm not sure he should be compared to Novelists. With his lowbrow humor, lifted plots, and short works, he's more like a primordial comedy television writer than anything else. The fact that he used politics and satire only strengthens the case, as does his remarkable quotability.

His works were very accessible at the time, drawing on common references, though they seem impenetrable to us now, but how impenetrable will Family Guy's jokes about Paris Hilton be in four-hundred years?

He was certainly a wordsmith, though at a time when words and spelling were modular or even optional, creating words wasn't as remarkable as it is today. This was before the widespread codification of language we now labor under, after all.

I won't say he isn't one of the greatest writers, but I'm not convinced Novelists and Epicists are the best comparison. He rewrote earlier stories, and the stories he wrote have been rewritten. He's a vital link in the chain, but his importance is overstated because people tend to concentrate on him to the exclusion of his peers or antecedents. The importance claimed of him by academics has become self-fulfilling.

>> No.668136

>>If indeed they were all by one writer, then it is entirely fair to say that man is the greatest writer in the history of the English language. Some might contest Milton,

True. But what if they were written by more than one writer? What would that do to our heroic ideas of authorship and lone genius?

Or put it this way: Sir William Empson, who was a very well-read and intelligent man, and a good poet, so I won't knock him for being a critic, at the end of his life declared that he had read Marvell's satirical poems "Advice to a Painter" and decided that it was clearly the work of 6 different people. Most professional Marvell scholars thought Empson was just off his trolley (as they say in the UK), and he probably was.

But seriously....what if? We act like geniuses act in isolation, that they owe nothing to other people.....and then suddenly somebody discovers that John Milton plagiarized one of the best phrases in Lycidas from a lousy poem called "Sir John Van Olden Barnavelt"

The phrase, incidentally, describes a writer's desire for fame..."that last infirmity of noble minds".

>>others Joyce, or any number of other writers, but the volume and brilliance of Shakespeare's work is undeniable;

It's true. But did you ever think maybe Joyce realized that people were so obsessed with Shakespeare that they were not prepared to acknowledge another great writer, and so to make them pay attention, he just gave his book the title of the character who has the longest, most boring single speech in Shakespeare's work: Ulysses?

Ulysses, whose father, incidentally, had the same name as Ophelia's brother. Laertes. Nobody mentions this in the National Library chapter of Joyce's novel. It's probably irrelevant. But what if it isn't?

>>as is his expertise with language, and not to be forgotten, the sheer entertainment of his plays.

Agreed. Although try sitting through "The Merry Wives of Windsor" someday. Bonus dormitat Homerus....

>> No.668151

>>668136
Well, we know it was common practice for Elizabethan plays to have five or six different writers (and editors), but that they might still only be published under one guy's name. Stealing isn't the exception to creation, it's the rule. Authors steal even when they don't mean to. The dadaist myth of the 'truly new idea' is just silly egotism. We profit more when we steal deliberately and knowingly, because the only other option is to do it naively and ignorantly.

>> No.668151,1 [INTERNAL] 

>>667573
M-Mr Pynchon?

>> No.668151,2 [INTERNAL] 

>>667573
hey tommy

>> No.668151,3 [INTERNAL] 

The guy is pretty adamant he's not Pynchon, and his T&T theory is no less well developed than or differently phrased to the Stoker one. If it were Pynchon you'd think there would be some disparity there. Don't get ahead of yourselves.

>> No.668151,4 [INTERNAL] 

>>668151,3
>>668151,3
>>668151,3
woah

>> No.668151,5 [INTERNAL] 

creepy

>> No.668151,6 [INTERNAL] 

sounds like a bipolar lad on a coke bump with some second rate reading TBH

>> No.668151,7 [INTERNAL] 

I think one of the greatest novelists of all time visits our Mongolian sand painting web site

>> No.668151,8 [INTERNAL] 

>>https://warosu.org/lit/thread/S640883#p643592

i found him in another thread about Shakespeare

>> No.668151,9 [INTERNAL]  [DELETED] 

/thread/S640883#p643592

i found him in another thread about Shakespeare

>> No.668151,10 [INTERNAL]  [DELETED] 

thread/S640883

i found him in another thread about Shakespeare

>> No.668151,11 [INTERNAL] 

>>668151,2
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based ghostposters

>> No.668151,12 [INTERNAL] 

>>668151,11
based ghostposter quoting ghostposter

>> No.668151,13 [INTERNAL] 

I want to believe it's Shteyngart

>>
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