Quantcast
[ 3 / biz / cgl / ck / diy / fa / g / ic / jp / lit / sci / tg / vr ] [ index / top / reports / report a bug ] [ 4plebs / archived.moe / rbt ]

Maintenance is complete! We got more disk space.
Become a Patron!

/ic/ - Artwork/Critique


View post   

[ Toggle deleted replies ]
File: 1023 KB, 2096x2096, Microbial_Art_Ani_Tsitsishvili_001.jpg [View same] [iqdb] [saucenao] [google] [report]
4010682 No.4010682 [Reply] [Original]

Pic Related.
Microbial art on petridishes with phosphorescent and colorful bacteria.

>> No.4010691
File: 418 KB, 694x694, Winter_Spring.jpg [View same] [iqdb] [saucenao] [google] [report]
4010691

Here, the exceptionally mindblowing one.

>The battle of winter and spring, Ana Tsitsishvili.
>On the picture isshown the battle of two microbes, as the battle of two seasons. On one side Staphylococcus,white as winter snow and Bacillus mycoides, they grow fast and cover every other microbes, but when they meet beautiful spring flowers, made by Serratia marcescens, they retreat, because antibiotic, produced by Serratia inhibit their growth. They melt, as warmth of the spring melts the snow; on other side of the plate spring wins, flowers of resistant Micrococcus, Rhodotorula and their mix are growing, as after winter always comes the spring and nature awakes.

>> No.4010703

>>4010682

What would happen if I licked one of those petri dishes?

>> No.4010710

>>4010703
Idk, m8.
Staphylococcus doesn't sound too safe now does it?
Unless you are one of those bath water binging thirsty gamers.

>> No.4010712

>>4010682
It's fun to try this if you ever get the chance.

>> No.4010730 [DELETED] 

>>4010703
Finally, my degree in microbiology comes in handy.

Based off of >>4010691 probably nothing
although it would taste like literal shit, trust me, most bacterial colonies smell fucking rank. The Staph used here (guessing epidermidis based on morphology), Micrococcus, and Rhodotorula are all non-infectious/opportunistic pathogens, so unless you have open sores in your mouth or ulcers in your stomach they wouldn't be able to survive through your digestive tract. Not sure what some of the blue pigmented species are, they could be transgenic E. coli but they're way too vibrant to be on X-gal plates. If some of the yellows are Staph aureus you probably don't want to be licking those.

>> No.4010733

>>4010703
Finally, my degree in microbiology comes in handy.

Based off of >>4010691 probably nothing although it would taste like literal shit, trust me, most bacterial colonies smell fucking rank. The Staph used here (guessing epidermidis based on morphology), Micrococcus, and Rhodotorula are all non-infectious/opportunistic pathogens, so unless you have open sores in your mouth or ulcers in your stomach they wouldn't be able to survive through your digestive tract. Not sure what some of the blue pigmented species are, they could be transgenic E. coli but they're way too vibrant to be on X-gal plates. If some of the yellows are Staph aureus you probably don't want to be licking those.

>> No.4010747

>>4010733
>Finally, my degree in microbiology comes in handy.
My sides.

>> No.4010759

>>4010733
What stops the colonies from growing and ruining the image and how long do bacteria colonies normally live for?
I imagine this is like those intricate sculptor made out of fruit/food. Only last a few days.

>> No.4010945

>>4010759
Maybe they put antibiotics on the negative shapes.

>> No.4010998 [DELETED] 

>>4010747
I’m exaggerating, but by less than you’d think.

>>4010759
There’s a few factors. Like >>4010945 suggested, some species of bacteria endogenously produce antibiotics or secreted toxins that prevent growth of nearby unresistant species. There is also an inherent limit on how far a colony can inherently spread out from the center of inoculation. Even though agar is kind of like a jelly consistency to it, it actually represents a lot of surface tension and friction to something the size of a bacterium, so the first cell to give “birth” to a new colony is essentially immobilized where it is place down on the surface of the agar. As that cell grows and divides, it pushes out it’s daughter cells both horizontally along the surface and vertically in stacks.

These cells could grow and divide essentially indefinitely, as long as new food was constantly made available and wastes removed. We can actually replicate those conditions in the lab in a device called a chemostat, which has shown that bacteria are functionally immortal (don’t die from “old age” like humans). However on a plate that isn’t the case, and eventually the bacteria closest to the surface will exhaust all of the available nutrients. At that point they’ll transition into stationary/starvation and halt cell division, preventing the colony from spreading any more across the surface. How long this actually takes is a function of the growth rate of the bacterium, which could be as fast as 3 cell divisions/hour (E. coli, B. subtilis under ideal conditions) to as slow as 1 cell division/14 days (Rhodobacter species under ideal conditions).

>> No.4011003

>>4010747 #
I’m exaggerating, but by less than you’d think.

>>4010759 #
There’s a few factors. Like >>4010945 # suggested, some species of bacteria endogenously produce antibiotics or secreted toxins that prevent growth of nearby unresistant species. There is also an inherent limit on how far a colony can spread out from the center of inoculation. Even though agar is kind of like a jelly consistency to it, it actually represents a lot of surface tension and friction to something the size of a bacterium, so the first cell to give “birth” to a new colony is pretty much immobilized where it is place down on the surface of the agar. As that cell grows and divides, it pushes out it’s daughter cells both horizontally along the surface and vertically in stacks.

These cells could grow and divide essentially indefinitely, as long as new food was constantly made available and wastes removed. We can actually replicate those conditions in the lab in a device called a chemostat, which has shown that bacteria are immortal (don’t die from “old age” like humans). However on a plate that isn’t the case, and eventually the bacteria closest to the surface will exhaust all of the available nutrients. At that point they’ll transition into stationary/starvation and halt cell division, preventing the colony from spreading any more across the surface. How long this actually takes is a function of the growth rate of the bacterium, which could be as fast as 3 cell divisions/hour (E. coli, B. subtilis under ideal conditions) to as slow as 1 cell division/14 days (Rhodobacter species under ideal conditions).

>> No.4011321

This is the best thread I've seen on /ic/ since I joined 4chan this year.

>> No.4011415

>>4011003
So these pieces are not actually that shortlived?
Great.

>> No.4011445

>>4010691
Needs more Loomis.

>> No.4012064 [DELETED] 

Test.

>> No.4012066
File: 336 KB, 712x743, Elk.jpg [View same] [iqdb] [saucenao] [google] [report]
4012066

Me personal fav.

>> No.4012067
File: 1.13 MB, 450x188, ohno.gif [View same] [iqdb] [saucenao] [google] [report]
4012067

>>4010703
>What would happen if I licked one of those petri dishes?

>> No.4012097

>>4010682
How is it "drawn"?

>> No.4012112

>>4012097
you just place the base for the culture strategically then have a few gay people breathe onto it, the STDs will develop colorful patterns

>> No.4012114

>>4012097
They probably design the image of the plate beforehand in Photoshop and then trace over a printout with using inoculated toothpick with each species they want to grow.

>> No.4012153

>>4012097
They draw beforehand on the outer surface of the petridish and then contaminate the agar medium with the bacteria accordingly.
The main difficulty of this artform was that one gets to see the actual result weeks later (no realtime rendering, so to speak), but with the abovementioned pipeline, the artist successfully achieves the control, although each time ending up with slight, but pleasantly surprising deviations.
Pure genius.
Nice surename too.

>> No.4012297
File: 379 KB, 712x712, Microbes.jpg [View same] [iqdb] [saucenao] [google] [report]
4012297

Another one.

>>
Name (leave empty)
Comment (leave empty)
Name
E-mail
Subject
Comment
Password [?]Password used for file deletion.
reCAPTCHA
Action