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/ck/ - Food & Cooking


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8896853 No.8896853 [Reply] [Original]

Hi /ck/
I was asked to make a thread about this.

>> No.8896856

Ching chong. Bing bong.

>> No.8896866
File: 789 KB, 860x537, 莜面.png [View same] [iqdb] [saucenao] [google]
8896866

>>8896853

I'm an expat in China, I live in Inner Mongolia with a Chinese wife (it's a stereotype). She can cook almost all Chinese Inner Mongolian cuisine and a few ethnic Mongolian dishes too.

Inner Mongolia is an autonomous region of China, basically a province with affirmative action for Mongolians. It's fairly different to Mongolia which is a country to the north and has a Russian influence cuisine.

We have ethnic Mongolian cuisine, 'Outer' Mongolian cuisine and Mongolian-influenced Han Chinese cuisine here. I'm mostly talking about the local two but I know a bit about outer Mongolia too if you want to ask. We eat out at restaurants that serve all three of these, I can cook a couple and she can cook a lot of them.

Rice isn't very popular here, most dishes use noodles or bread. Pork and Chicken are uncommon, beef and lamp are typical and local meats are very high quality. Stews are a big thing and picked vegetables are very, very common. There's usually a bowl of something pickled on the table and lots of dishes use saurkraut, kimchi or other kinds of pickles. Hotpots are popular and most households have an electric hotpot for big family dinners.

Inner Mongolia has large dairy and beef/lamb industries, a lot of meat comes from animals raised in the grasslands by families of Mongolian herders though now they usually live on farms instead of being nomads. The milk and meat are excellent here and exported to all of China (also Mongolia exports shitloads of meat to China) as premium quality meat. Mongolians make several kinds of unique cheese and also like milk tea.

pic related is the dish that started this thread, it's an oat flour noodle. The oats are lightly cooked and ground into flour (and cooked again), then made into dough, shaped into tubes, noodles or other things and steamed. You tear them apart with your hands and mix them with side dishes in your bowl.

>> No.8896869

>>8896853

I would love to try actual Mongolian food and I think it'd go over well in the US, too. But any actual Mongolian restaurant would have to have a BBQ section to please the play-it-safe contingent of customers.

>> No.8896870
File: 92 KB, 500x375, shumai.jpg [View same] [iqdb] [saucenao] [google]
8896870

>>8896866

I'm going to vaguely lurk this thread for a few hours but I'll properly come back in about six hours and tomorrow and answer any questions waiting for me. Anything I don't know, I'll ask my wife.

pic related is shumai which Cantonese suimai and Shanghai Xiaolongbao are both based on. The Inner Mongolian version is minced lamb and leek. Said to have been invented when some merchants couldn't finish their lunch and asked for the leftovers to be chopped up and turned into dumplings for their dinner. They're pretty good.

>> No.8896872

>>8896869
>any actual Mongolian restaurant would have to have a BBQ section
That kind of 'Mongolian BBQ' is Korean, invented in Seoul...but Inner Mongolia has BBQ lamb, often racks of ribs. Rubbed in chilli and cumin, it's fantastic. I think that would go down well in the US because what kind of American doesn't like some spicy BBQ ribs?

>> No.8896875

>>8896869
>actual Mongolian food
Outer Mongolian food has a lot of Russian influence. They have dried/smoked sausages, Russian salads, stuff like that. They like horse meat much more than in Inner Mongolia too.

>> No.8896888

This is a neat thread and I'm keeping an eye on it in the hope that it lasts long enough for OP to come back.

>> No.8896921

>>8896872

Right! I know that "Mongolian BBQ" isn't actually Mongolian, but you have to have certain familiar menu items if you want to have a successful ethnic restaurant in America. Same reason that 99% of Chinese restaurants in the US offer Orange Chicken.

>> No.8896925

>>8896875

Makes sense. I don't think of Outer Mongolian food as any more or less "actual Mongolian" than Inner Mongolian food. It's food prepared by Mongolians for Mongolians.

>> No.8896940

>>8896866

You have to tell us more about Mongolian cheese. I never knew that dairy featured in any East Asian cuisine. Do Mongolians drink straight milk? Do they have the genes for lactose tolerance?

>> No.8897019
File: 1.72 MB, 3264x1836, 20170505_182543.jpg [View same] [iqdb] [saucenao] [google]
8897019

>>8896925
>Makes sense. I don't think of Outer Mongolian food as any more or less "actual Mongolian" than Inner Mongolian food. It's food prepared by Mongolians for Mongolians

Inner Mongolia is also referred to as Southern Mongolia, especially when talking about the tribes. They are separated from Northern Mongolians by the Gobi Desert so they've developed a bit differently and it wasn't that hard for Chinese emperors to play divide and conquer by assimilating the Southern Mongolians (by marriage, treaty and trade) into the empire and keeping them as a buffer against the Northern Mongolians.

So basically, they're different in many ways but also have a lot in common. Same language though they write it differently.

>>8896921
>"Mongolian BBQ" isn't actually Mongolian
Yeah but the crazy thing is that they do regular BBQ really well.

>>8896940
>You have to tell us more about Mongolian cheese
I figured this would come up so I took a photo at the supermarket a few minutes ago, most of the big supermarkets are in shopping malls and there's usually a Mongolian dairy shop right outside the checkouts. This is their counter (there's also another bit with biscuits and jerky but it's boring).
The cheeses are mostly hard cheeses and there's:
* a kind called milk skin which is basically what it sounds like, made from skimming the curd/skin off fresh milk I think, that's the roundish one in the pic
* an other kind is called milk tofu but it really a semi-firm cheese almost like ricotta, it just looks kinda like tofu
* there's also one I don't know the name of but it's similar to a very salty, very hard parmesan

A bunch of others too but those are the most common.>>8896940
>Do Mongolians drink straight milk? Do they have the genes for lactose tolerance?
No, I don't think they drink it straight except for in milk tea. They might have lactose tolerance since they're a turkic race but they're also inter-bred with Han so who knows. Horse milk wine is a thing, like vodka.

>> No.8897021

finn thread? :DD

>> No.8897037
File: 127 KB, 1200x884, karjalanpiirakka.jpg [View same] [iqdb] [saucenao] [google]
8897037

>>8896853
Karjalan piirakka (english: horseman's reward) is a famous pastry made in the Genghis Khan era for the soldiers.

>> No.8897044

>>8897037
I haven't seen that but both Outer and Inner Mongolians have a fried pastry filled with heavily spiced lamb and carrot and onion which is really good.

It's called something like Shabing, I'll find out the exact name.

>> No.8897049

>>8897037

I still don't get why this meme targets Finns. Wouldn't Slavs or Hungarians make more sense?

>> No.8897062

>>8897044
Xianrbing
馅饼

>> No.8897066

>>8896856
Hong Pong Fong

>> No.8897070

>>8896853
There is a place in wellington NZ called genghis khan. http://www.genghiskhanrestaurant.co.nz/.. So they have these massive steal drum barbecues manned by a couple of chefs but the little extension next to them is an array of sliced meats, peppers, vegetables, oils, chilli, salt, noodles i think, you choose the ingredients you can literally have all meat and take it up to the chefs, they cook that shit up on the bbq and you go back to your table and chow, continue ad infinitum. You can make insane combos and try everything. Plus if you like filler the bread is fucking delicious unleavened i think, and then there is the most delicious chicken chowder soup i have ever had.

I am going tomorrow!

>> No.8897086

>>8896853
>[insert non-white country] cuisine

It's basically dog dicks and rotten onions with the taste masked completely by a massive amount of spice.

>> No.8897093

>>8897086
back to /pol/ sir

>> No.8897095

>>8897070
>curry puffs
>satay
>Deep-Fried Ice Cream

Yeah, that looks about what >>8896921 was talking about.

Enjoy your Korean BBQ, I had a korean housemate who used to invite her friends over and make it, it's pretty good.

>> No.8897107
File: 158 KB, 1024x683, 馅饼.jpg [View same] [iqdb] [saucenao] [google]
8897107

>>8897062
So this is 馅饼 or Xianrbing. It's actually a Mongolian dish and both Inner and Outer both eat it. The ones I had in Outer Mongolia used way more pepper but otherwise it's about the same. It's always lamb but everything else in it changes.

They're a pretty good hamburger desu

>> No.8897114

>>8897095
Sweet, thats just a new korean place for me! Thanks for the info. What else is a sham restaurant trends should I look out for?

>> No.8897115

>>8897107
Looks delicious.

>> No.8897122

>>8897114
Japanese restaurants are also mostly just Korean BBQ, especially sushi which nobody even eats in Japan.

>> No.8897127

>>8897122
>especially sushi which nobody even eats in Japan.
Bitch I'm in Japan, sushi-go-round restaurants are everywhere. Even the grocery stores have sushi.

>> No.8897129

>>8897114
>Sweet, thats just a new korean place for me
Yeah, Korean BBQ is pretty good and I do like Fried Ice cream now and then, best when they roll it in coconut before freezing it.

>> No.8897137

But can you explain why you keep tearing down shitty wall?

>> No.8897174

>>8897122
>nobody eats sushi
>went to Japan
>sushi is in all the grocery stores, rotating sushi and traditional restaurants are abundant
You're objectively wrong.

>> No.8897436
File: 12 KB, 304x228, mongor.jpg [View same] [iqdb] [saucenao] [google]
8897436

>>8897137

>> No.8897454

>>8897107
>So this is 馅饼 or Xianrbing. It's actually a Mongolian dish
Is this actually mongolian in origin or do you think gyoza is a japanese dish as well?

>> No.8897470

I heard kumiss is popular in Mongolia too, although I tried it in Kazakhstan. It's fucking disgusting, like sour milk mixed with beer.

>> No.8897488

>>8896866
Hi SerpentZA, kick C-Milk in the balls for me.

>> No.8897497

>>8897107
I'm giving those bad boys a try next week.

>> No.8897510 [DELETED] 

weeeeeeOOOOOOOOOOOwWWWWWWWWWWWeEEEEEEEEEEEEEoooooooooooooooooEEEEEEEEEEEEEEEEWWWWWWWWwwwwwwwwwwwweeeeeeeeeeeooooooooooooooooo

*clears throat*

>> No.8897610

>>8897093
>le boogyman

>> No.8897634

>>8897454
>Is this actually mongolian in origin or do you think gyoza is a japanese dish as well?
It's not the same as gyoza except in that it's meat inside pastry.

I'd say the concept is probably basic enough that everyone has come up with it. The Ancient greeks had a form of pizza, there's only so many ways you can put food together.

But what I actually meant was that this dish isn't exactly like anything else that I've had. The pastry is flaky and layered and crisps, not like gyoza or jiaozi. I couldn't talk about it's origin because I really don't know.

>>8897470
>kumiss is popular in Mongolia
Maybe amongst the rural nomads, I never saw it in UB. Mongolians mostly drink local vodka which is really high quality, I highly recommend Chingis Platinum if you ever get the chance, it's not even expensive but it's by far, the best vodka I've ever tasted. Definitely good enough to just drink straight.

The Horse Milk Wine that I've had is mostly in Inner Mongolia, I haven't seen it in Mongolia. It's a clear spirit, looks like vodka and tastes like milky vodka. It's amazing in a Black Russian.

>>8897488
I have no idea what you're talking about.

>> No.8897662

>>8897093

But his comment had nothing to do with politics?

>> No.8897849

>>8897634
I'm just comparing it to gyoza because it's a dish that was literally copied within the last 50 years but people think it's distinctively japanese. I wasn't talking about its texture. Xianbing is popular in the rest of china and I think korea with different fillings.

>> No.8898265

Thanks OP, you are not a faggot.

>> No.8899415

>>8897849
>Xianbing is popular in the rest of china and I think korea with different fillings
I wouldn't know about Korea but I've been all over China and only seen it once or twice elsewhere.

I'm sure that there's a version of it around, some use a similar elastic pastry to Jiaozi and those might be around elsewhere with different fillings. The idea of just making a big jiaozi exists, those are called Hezi (盒子), they usually have scrambled egg and garlic chives but I'm sure they exist with pork and cabbage or something. The filling in Xianbing though, is spiced lamb with carrot and onion which is not something I've seen anywhere else.

There IS a pastry made by Hui which is similar, that uses puff pastry enclosing minced lamb. Other than being much thinner, it's and probably shares origin with Xianbing. I had that pastry in Kaifeng, Henan province but it was made by the Muslim immigrant community there which is very old and likely originates from the Hui autonomous region which is right next door to Inner Mongolia anyway.

You're obviously right about Gyoza, that doesn't even try to hide it's name. FWIW: I think the Gyoza skin is quite different to Jiaozi, it somehow ends up being kind of rubbery which I don't even like. I mentioned Gyoza because it's made in a pretty similar way, you roll out some pastry and fill it with filling and fold it up. There is similarity between them, they're in the same family but the filling in these seems to be unique to Mongolian cuisine (at least within Asia).

>> No.8899418

>>8898265
>Thanks OP, you are not a faggot.
You're welcome.

>>8897662
/pol/ doesn't have anything to do with politics either, it's just an excuse for losers to bitch about other types of people. Which is what the loser anon complained about was doing. Acting like a /pol/tard outside /pol/ is rightly called out for what it is.

>> No.8899506

>>8899418
>Acting like a /pol/tard outside /pol/ is rightly called out for what it is.

Yes, indeed. You have an interesting thread going about a culture most of us have no idea about.

>> No.8899558 [DELETED] 
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8899558

>>8899415
You might technically be right, I honestly wouldn't know. I've got family in Dongbei, and the only difference between xianbing and hezi to them is the shape. I'm sure you know it, but xianbing just means 'filling flatbread.' They'll call a chives filled xianbing 'xianbing' as long as its round. The 'he' part of hezi just refers to the two sides joined together.

One type of bing(饼) that is somewhat popular in dongbei is this pastry called niurou(beef) huoshao. It's brushed with a roux and is flaky. Typically eaten with a lamb intestine soup, though my relatives say they don't use much lamb anymore.

>> No.8899561
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8899561

>>8899415
You might technically be right, I honestly wouldn't know. I've got family in Dongbei, and the only difference between xianbing and hezi to them is the shape. I'm sure you know it, but xianbing just means 'filling flatbread.' They'll call a chives filled xianbing 'xianbing' as long as its round. The 'he' part of hezi just refers to the two sides joined together.

One type of bing(饼) that is somewhat popular in dongbei is this pastry called niurou(beef) huoshao. It's brushed with a roux and is flaky. Typically eaten with a lamb intestine soup, though my relatives say they don't use much lamb anymore, or beef, for that matter.

>> No.8899568

im not sure what its actually called, but my parents always made this delicious soup with thin slices of raw meat that would cook in the liquid. think it was shaba shaba or something. mongolion hotpot.

>> No.8899616

>>8896853
I just did mongolian fried peanuts. Or at least that's what the book I used calls them, do you have any recipes for them that are more authentic. The book I found lists to boil them in star anise, seschuan pepercorn salt and sugar then soak for 10+ hours, roast @350 f, then fry.
They taste as good as fried peanuts should, but the anise and seschuan peppercorn don't really seem to show through the roasting and frying.

>> No.8899710
File: 301 KB, 900x500, 涮羊肉.gif [View same] [iqdb] [saucenao] [google]
8899710

>>8899561
>I've got family in Dongbei
Well Dongbei is Manchu territory and it's often said that Manchu and Mongolian tribes are cousins in one family. I've had that in Shenyang I think and I've occasionally seen it elsewhere.

>Typically eaten with a lamb intestine soup
That's very popular in Inner Mongolia, good ones are very good, bad ones are very bad. It's a bit like haggis in that respect.

>>8899568
>my parents always made this delicious soup with thin slices of raw meat that would cook in the liquid. think it was shaba shaba or something. mongolion hotpot.

Is your family Taiwanese? Shaba-shaba is the Taiwanese name for Japanese Shabu-shabu which is the Japanese fish version of Chinese Shuàn Yángròu (涮羊肉) which is Mongolian lamb hotpot.

It's hotpot made from a lamb bone soup and eaten with frozen, shaved lamb. We have it at home about once a month if my wife is in a good mood. We buy some vegetables and chop them up, buy or make noodles and buy the sliced meat. Lamb is traditional but I get beef too. The soup comes as paste in a packet and goes in the pot with boiling water and we throw in some chilli, garlic cloves and ginger too. Red dates and a few other things go in as well.

Lots of households have an electric hotpot at home to make this, corner stores and markets nearly always have the sliced meat and soup packets.

>>8899616
>I just did mongolian fried peanuts
I've literally never heard of that. The only peanut recipe I know involves siquan pepper and chilli and is most famously made in Kaifeng, there's a popular commercial brand called Wong Feihung Peanuts which is basically the same thing. I've never seen any kind of 'traditional Mongolian' peanuts in Inner or Outer Mongolia.

>> No.8901581

This thread is what I thought /ck/ would be like before I started coming
Thanks OP, good stuff