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/ck/ - Food & Cooking


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File: 152 KB, 495x746, Delmonico_menu_April_1899.jpg [View same] [iqdb] [saucenao] [google]
18398419 No.18398419 [Reply] [Original]

you're suddenly transported back in time to a dinner party at Delmonicos in NYC on April 18, 1899

what are you ordering?

>> No.18398432

Vienna chicken, sautee potatoes, spinach and asparagus. And you better believe I'm having a Fancy Cream of some sort for dessert. Plus a Turkish Coffee.

Though in reality, if I time travelled back I'd want to take my preconceptions OUT of the meal and ask the waiter for his recommendations and take him full at his word.

>> No.18398451

>>18398419
Was it really that expensive back then, or am I misreading the menu? 200 for a roast chicken? 130 bucks for strawberries and cream?

>> No.18398453

>>18398451
$2.00 probably

>> No.18398456

>>18398419
Dessert cheese...

>> No.18398458

I was a butcher in a small shop for a while, always annoyed me when random boomers would come in asking for a "delmonico steak" as if that was a cut and not the name of a restaurant they'd never even eaten at.

>> No.18398460

>>18398419
Probably would go with a lot of oysters and fish to experience how they taste pre-plastic everything

>> No.18398467

>>18398453
Ooo they use a space instead of a period.

In that case. I would get a dozen oysters, caviar, anchovies on toast, terrine de foie gras, roast canvas back duck, potatoes, artichoke bottoms, a variety of fresh fruit with some cheese for dessert.

A lot of wine and some good port with the cheese.

>> No.18398487
File: 676 KB, 498x750, file.png [View same] [iqdb] [saucenao] [google]
18398487

>> No.18398495

>>18398419
Uhhhh....can I just get a burger with fries?

>> No.18398503

Softshell crab. I assume it's a sandwich?

>> No.18398513

>>18398419
>what are you ordering?
my slave around.

>> No.18398558

>>18398503
considering veg is listed individually i assume you're just getting a plate of boiled crab.

>> No.18398613

>>18398467
That sounds tremendously rich - I can feel the gout crystals forming just reading it. Absolutely perfect.

>> No.18398624

>>18398419

What's their equivalent of the chicken tendies? I'll have that.

>> No.18398677

>>18398419
Cream of artichoke soup
Spring lamb
Watercress salad
Hashed potatoes

Dessert will be peach pie and French coffee.

>> No.18398730

>>18398419
>Delmonicos in NYC on April 18, 1899
I dont know but I know I would end up with a stomach bug from the poor sanitation and food handling of the time.

>> No.18398869

>>18398467
Bear in mind $1 back in 1899 is like $36 dollars today, so it is pretty expensive

>> No.18398879

>>18398730
They weren't that bad in 1899, people had known about washing their hands for 30+ years at that point, and food preservation had come a long way. Plus it's New York, which at the time was actually still good and they had ice cars on trains and so on to transport shit

Most likely everything would probably be fresher than you get today

>> No.18398883

>>18398869
So you're essentially paying $18 for a plate of
just lettuce? Sounds like a place you'd go just to show off if that's the case

>> No.18398887
File: 268 KB, 711x831, Adulteration and Contamination of Food in Victorian England.png [View same] [iqdb] [saucenao] [google]
18398887

>>18398879
it's not the handwashing you had to worry about

>> No.18398898

>>18398887
If >>18398869 is correct this place is super expensive and should likely be alright. Plus it's a hypothetical question about what you'd order from an old menu.

Considering not everyone back then died, I'm sure clean food was available

>> No.18398917

>>18398467
fuck yeah
eat like a robber baron

>> No.18398932
File: 122 KB, 1108x831, mr-creosote-terry-jones-1108x0-c-default.jpg [View same] [iqdb] [saucenao] [google]
18398932

>>18398467
And don't skimp on the pate

>> No.18398940

Soup: Chicken gumbo
Side: Caviar
Fish: Soft shell crab
Ready: Sirloin of beef with mashed carrot
Roast: Canvas back duck
Entremets: Renaissance pudding
Dessert: Tutti frutti

>> No.18398953

>>18398419
Soup, cream of artichoke
Entrees, pigeon with peas
veg, fried eggplant
desert, basket of strawberries with marachino

>> No.18398964

>>18398883
>Delmonico's is the name of a series of restaurants that operated in New York City, with the present version located at 56 Beaver Street in the Financial District of Manhattan. The original version was widely recognized as the United States’ first fine dining restaurant. Beginning as a small cafe and pastry shop in 1827, Delmonico’s eventually grew into a hospitality empire that encompassed several luxury restaurants catering to titans of industry, the political elite and cultural luminaries. In many respects, Delmonico’s represented the genesis of American fine dining cuisine, pioneering numerous restaurant innovations, developing iconic American dishes, and setting a standard for dining excellence.

>> No.18398977

>>18398419
Bisque of shrimp, canvas-back duck, renaissance pudding. Not every day you get to try new foods like that.

>> No.18398996
File: 11 KB, 291x291, chaka.jpg [View same] [iqdb] [saucenao] [google]
18398996

>>18398419
>vegetables
>Spaghetti, Neapolitan
wut

>> No.18399010

>>18398977
>renaissance pudding
Still can't find out what this is. Could be a bread pudding of some kind.

>> No.18399035

>>18398879
>Most likely everything would probably be fresher than you get today
lol not likely unless you're apples to oranges comparing this to buffet or fast food sloppa. food science and germ theory were still in its infancy (the big leaps came during WW1 and WW2 due to the pressure of feeding troops). the very existence of viruses was only discovered in 1892, surgeons may have been washing their hands but it was hardly commonplace or universal to people working in say, food prep. it took until the 1980s for the CDC to start publishing actual handwashing guidelines for restaurant staff. on a grosser level, toilet paper was still just coming into existence and options for wiping shit included anything you could get your hands on, or failing that, your hand like indians do today.

so chances are good even the 'elite' of this time period were consuming decent quantities of fecal matter with their fine dining

secondly sanitization of surfaces was still a long way off, you had cross contamination on every level of the food preparation business. the ice from lakes they harvested to keep meats cool certainly wasn't clean, neither were the cars or the crates they put the food into, nor surfaces, nor cutting implements. canning existed but nobody understood botulism. insects got into everything (they still get into everything, but we at least understand fine-level sanitation nowadays). meat processing facilities were disgusting (and this is seven years off of the first meat inspection agencies in the US). pasteurization was known about but certainly not widespread even for things where it would've been most useful like dairy products or wine (no, the 14% ABV doesn't kill pathogens like reddit told you).

in other words it was better than literal raw peasant medieval times but not even a candle to today's marvel of logistics and food preservation and sanitation practices. that started with the 1940s-1950s when containerization took off.

>> No.18399057

>>18398419
Too expensive. Thank you for your company gentlemen, but I'd rather just go to McDonald's

>> No.18399061

>>18398419

That side of olives better be 25 cents even if it's 1899

>> No.18399068

>>18398419
ill have the turtle soup

>> No.18399090

Shrimp Bisque
Dandelion salad
Duckling
Artichoke bottom
Ice cream charlotte

>> No.18399114

For me, it's the beef tornadoes with parsnip cake and asparagus.. uh the new kind I guess. Also both french and turkish coffee to go with dessert, vanilla and chocolate ice cream. chop chop

>> No.18399225

>>18398419
Nothing because I don't have any money that would be accepted back then

>> No.18399293

>>18398419
Damn, that place was incredibly expensive. Must have been for the very rich only.

>> No.18399307

>>18398898
Or these things being present in food arent as big a problem as we're likely to think

>> No.18399308

>>18399035
Then why did everyone drink shitty beer instead of water

>> No.18399317

>>18399293
it was
see
>>18398964

>> No.18399322

>>18399308
they drunk water, everyone drinking beer is a pop his meme. water was the easiest to get, free if you found it, and they didn't understand germs so they know the local well could kill you so they didn't care. if it looked clean and smelled clean they didn't give a shit even if the well was being filtered off of the same river they dumped their chamberpots into
90% of the reason the great cholera outbreaks in london in the 1800s happened was because people drank water this way
and beer was contaminated too, ask any modern brewer about all the steps they need to keep contaminants out of the brew and none of them were followed back when, people got sick off beer and it spoiled constantly and sometimes was poisoned when they threw in ergot contaminated barley (yeah it effects barley, and most other grains too) in the batch. ergot was not seen as a cause of disease, they used the weird black grains all the time without making the connection.

>> No.18399327

>>18399322
*so they didn't know

>> No.18399339

>>18399322
I am a brewer and its next to impossible for beer to contain pathogenic microbes.
They either get destroyed during the wort boil, or they get outcompeted by fermentation microbe or die in the low-oxygen environment.
Any "contamination" you can get in beer is just different fermentation microbes like lactobacillus and brett that isn't harmful but may put off the flavour of your beer.

>> No.18399392

>>18399322
>and beer was contaminated too,
Rarely.

>ask any modern brewer about all the steps they need to keep contaminants out of the brew
For safety, not many. At all. Saccaromyces are exceptionally good at out-competing basically everything else you find in your prepared sugar water and because wort is boiled the chances of anything pathogenic surviving long enough or in sufficient quantity to compete with introduced cultures is basically negligible anyway. Brewers these days are anal about sanitizing because a measured culture is more controllable and much more consistent.

>and none of them were followed back when,
They absolutely were. You can find instructions for brewing preserved in fucking FOLKLORE that explicitly mention the need for clean water, clean vessels, etc. A poor understanding is not a lack of awareness.

>people got sick off beer
Rarely.

>and it spoiled constantly
True, depending on the beer. Strong beers and barleywines were often set aside for years or even decades but small beer spoiled readily.

>and sometimes was poisoned when they threw in ergot contaminated barley (yeah it effects barley, and most other grains too) in the batch.
That's on the malter, not the brewer. Sometimes they were the same person, but generally not.

>ergot was not seen as a cause of disease, they used the weird black grains all the time without making the connection.
Absolute horseshit. Peoples have been discovering, losing and rediscovered the effects of ergot for literally thousands of years. What's more, ergot generally does not survive malting and brewing. I am unaware of any cases whatsoever cases of ergot poisoning occurring through the consumption of beer; every historical outbreak recorded has been related to the use of contaminated grain in BREAD, where the grains are not malted but simply dried and ground.

https://www.researchgate.net/publication/279610701_Fate_of_Ergot_Claviceps_purpurea_Alkaloids_During_Malting_and_Brewing

>> No.18399463

>>18398964
Apparently they have a hidden billionaire's menu
https://www.businessinsider.com/secret-billionaire-menu-delmonicos-wall-street-steakhouse-2017-8

That $150 flatbread in 2017 is probably over $200 now

>> No.18399990

>>18399339
>>18399392
>boiling the wort
wasn't common until after the high middle ages, and then wasn't universal until modern sanitation standards. i don't think either of you realize what level of scientific incapability you're dealing with. medieval peoples, not even learned ones, began to understand the causative agents behind disease. they had no foundation for it, no basis to understand it. even simple concepts like 'boiling water to remove pathogens' had no basis in the ancient mind because they didn't even understand water could have pathogens. if they stumbled upon anything that resembled modern sanitation they learned through accident or deductive logic.

>Saccaromyces
yeah sure modern super-yeast strains, but all ancient beers were made basically through wild yeast or holding over brewer's yeast from the last batch.

>clean water, clean vessels
they didn't understand what 'clean water and clean vessels' meant. scrubbing with some wood ash and having water that had no obvious debris was about as far as it got.

>Rarely.
it was commonplace.
>enterocolitica, Staph. aureus, Cl. botulinum, and Salmonella spp. have been reported to grow at the pH levels of the majority of beers (Figure 39.1). Even though these pathogens can grow at these low pH values, other hurdles in beer (such as ethanol, hops, and CO2) provide extra barriers to growth.
>https://www.sciencedirect.com/science/article/pii/B9780123738912000390

note that the last three barriers to growth, ethanol, hops, and co2 were not universal nor commonplace the farther back you go. controlling for ethanol with advanced super strains wasn't a thing that happened, what you got was what you got. carbonation and controlling carbonation wasn't a guarantee and beer was often flat when it got shipped off. hops were not common until after the high middle ages. Staph, salmonella, botulism - all plagued the medieval world without ancient people's ability to understand why or how.

>> No.18399994

>That's on the malter, not the brewer
it's not like either of them would have understood to separate out the black grains. how exactly do you think the bread contamination happened?

>Absolute horseshit
did you even read your article? your own link refutes you, you fucking idiot.

conclusion section:
>The potential for alkaloid contamination of beer demonstrated
in this study reinforces the intent of international grade standards
for ergot. The use of ergot-contaminated malting barley should be
avoided, and if present, it should be removed through suitable clean-
ing practices.
>Our demonstration of ergot alkaloids in beer also supports ref-
erences to the consumption of contaminated beer as a historical
cause of ergotism (3). This follows because it is likely that lots of
contaminated grain would have been utilized for brewing until de-
pleted, and chronic exposure to ergot alkaloids could occur through
consumption of the staple beer. The pharmacological effects of
several alkaloids are apparent at relatively low doses. Finally, the
results of the current study show that spent grains had a much
higher level of alkaloids relative to beer, and the historical record
in Norway indicates that “during hunger years even the left-over
mash was used as food”
>>Our demonstration of ergot alkaloids in beer also supports ref-
erences to the consumption of contaminated beer as a historical
cause of ergotism (3).
>>Our demonstration of ergot alkaloids in beer also supports ref-
erences to the consumption of contaminated beer as a historical
cause of ergotism (3).

so, contaminated beer. st. anthony's fire was not understood in terms of causation until way into the industrial period. your 'wisdom of the ancients' arguments falls flat. they threw in black grains with everything. they didn't understand. it was just grains to them.

>> No.18400004

>>18399994
Imagine the shits after eating 6 bowls of spent barley grains a day. Damn, I guess if it was that or die...

>> No.18400016

>>18398419
I'll have the pigeon with peas

>> No.18400124

>>18398513
>1899
>NY
about 70 years too late

>> No.18400126

>>18400124
sorry *indentured Indian manservant i pay a token wage
better?

>> No.18400137

>>18399061
the spacing when it goes over a dollar suggests so

>> No.18400162

The braised beef and noodles sound pretty good.

>> No.18400242
File: 142 KB, 1400x1050, 5863230900_df1dae7aeb_o.0.0.1415634886.jpg [View same] [iqdb] [saucenao] [google]
18400242

Glad you could join us anon, but what the hell are you wearing?

>> No.18400276

>>18398996
Spaghetti as a "vegetable" is a very real thing. Unironically, this can also be the case at some southern and soul food restaurants

>> No.18400284

>>18398419
I'll have a julienne, bittersweet pickles, loin of lamb, pigeon with peas, hashed and baked potatoes with cream and a risotto with an ice cream meringe for dessert thank you very much.

>> No.18400291

>>18399990
>wasn't common until after the high middle ages, and then wasn't universal until modern sanitation standards.
We don't know that. Brewing methods have varied wildly throughout history and until a few centuries ago they were very poorly attested. You are making an assumption that isn't supported either way.

>i don't think either of you realize what level of scientific incapability you're dealing with. medieval peoples, not even learned ones, began to understand the causative agents behind disease. they had no foundation for it, no basis to understand it.
I understand quite well that they had no clue.

>even simple concepts like 'boiling water to remove pathogens' had no basis in the ancient mind
False. Multiple peoples in the past were aware of the benefits of water purification, even if they didn't understand what they were doing.

>because they didn't even understand water could have pathogens.
Patently false. Did they understand germ theory? No, of course not. Did they know enough to avoid gathering water from downstream of watering holes or stagnant ponds or whatever if they could help it? Did they know that they were less likely to fall ill from soup or alcohol? Yes.

>if they stumbled upon anything that resembled modern sanitation they learned through accident or deductive logic.
Yep.

>> No.18400298

>yeah sure modern super-yeast strains, but all ancient beers were made basically through wild yeast or holding over brewer's yeast from the last batch.
You are quite unfairly discounting the vigor and ubiquity of of saccharomyces.

>they didn't understand what 'clean water and clean vessels' meant.
Yes, they did. If you didn't know what good water was, you generally died painfully from shitting your guts out.

>scrubbing with some wood ash and having water that had no obvious debris was about as far as it got.
And generally that's plenty tolerable for beer, especially beers meant to be consumed immediately.

>note that the last three barriers to growth, ethanol, hops, and co2 were not universal nor commonplace the farther back you go.
Horseshit except for the part about hope hops and many other bittering agents (such as yarrow, mugwort and artemesia ) have microbicidal effects.

>controlling for ethanol with advanced super strains wasn't a thing that happened, what you got was what you got.
Yes, and with first runs on rich grain bills "what you got" would often be north of 7%.

>carbonation and controlling carbonation wasn't a guarantee
Yes, but even beer in unsealed containers (like a carboy with an airlock) there s still CO2 in suspension in the finished product if it remains still and furthermore vessel conditioning has been around for as long as people have been putting beer into anything sealed.

>and beer was often flat when it got shipped off.
Debatable and "often" is nebulous. We don't know the sugar content of past beers at bottling/kegging and references to the effervescent qualities of beer are well attested going back thousands of years.

>hops were not common until after the high middle ages.
Fair enough.

Staph, salmonella, botulism - all plagued the medieval world without ancient people's ability to understand why or how.
Correct. Much more so from sources that weren't beer.

>> No.18400299

>it's not like either of them would have understood to separate out the black grains.
Depending on the time and place yes, they would. Not in europe, though.

>how exactly do you think the bread contamination happened?
Where the hell did I ever say that bread couldn't be contaminated with ergot? Of course bread was contaminated with ergot.

>did you even read your article? your own link refutes you, you fucking idiot.
No, it doesn't.

>>supports references to
Which is academic for "we're making a supposition".

>so, contaminated beer.
I never argued that beer couldn't be contaminated, just that because of the temperatures involved in both malting and brewing the presence of noxious contaminants in beer were less than in beverages that did not undergo those kinds of treatments.

>st. anthony's fire was not understood in terms of causation until way into the industrial period.
Again, depends on time and place.

>your 'wisdom of the ancients' arguments falls flat. they threw in black grains with everything. they didn't understand. it was just grains to them.
Yep. And those black grains in beer were much less noxious than they were in pottage or bread or what have you.

>> No.18400302

Oysters
Split pea purée
Kingfish
Asparagus tips
Potatoes, hashed and baked in cream
Fine champagne sorbet

>> No.18400308

>>18398730
>I dont know but I know I would end up with a stomach bug from
your weak, coddled, atrophied immune system.

>> No.18400369

>>18400291
>and until a few centuries ago they were very poorly attested
for someone with such a vested interest in arguing about this on the internet, you sure haven't studied the ancient sources much. brewing is one of the few things from medieval times that is *very* well attested. and boiling the wort is universally held to be a relatively late development. you're running on hope by this point.
>Did they know enough to avoid gathering water from downstream of watering holes or stagnant ponds or whatever if they could help it? Did they know that they were less likely to fall ill from soup or alcohol? Yes.

LOL, no they didn't and people getting sick from water downstream of pollution was one of the most common ways to get sick in urban and built up environments. literally, the cholera outbreaks of the mid-1800s are 100% this one reason. read more, argue less.

>You are quite unfairly discounting the vigor and ubiquity of of saccharomyces.
you're not even trying by this point
>would often be north of 7%.
which isn't near enough to kill anything. it takes ABV% well over 50 in order to kill all pathogen growth. nothing you can brew will ever cut it.
>Most alcoholic beverages' alcohol content or alcohol by volume (ABV) of ethanol is below 60%, and therefore below concentrations necessary to kill most viruses and bacteria, according to Dr. Stephan Fihn, professor of General Internal Medicine and Health Services and head of General Internal Medicine at the University of Washington School of Medicine.
generally around 50-70% is what you need to kill pathogens. this is universal sanitation knowledge. you're basically arguing modern indian levels of sanitation knowledge right now lmfao.
>carboy with an airlock
ah the classic medieval carboy
lol are you even trying?
>Debatable
it's not. keeping carbonation sealed is a massive logistical challenge that only moderns figured out. read more, argue less.
>Correct.
i accept your concession

>> No.18400371

>>18400299
>No, it doesn't.
lol just lol
>I never argued that beer couldn't be contaminated
backpedaling
>I am unaware of any cases whatsoever cases of ergot poisoning occurring through the consumption of beer
LITERALLY IN YOUR OWN PAPER IT CITES HISTORICAL CASES
you didn't read it and got destroyed and now you're trying to argue with your own citation
lol i love it when morons cite papers that destroy their own position
learn to read beyond the abstract you fucking idiot, it's not hard. you have eyes for a reason, use them sometime pseud
lmao i win

>> No.18400466

>>18399463
What a shame. The 1899 menu is so classy compared to this nouveau riche ersatz shit.

>> No.18400482

>In John Mariani’s history of restaurant dining, “America Eats Out” (William Morrow and Co., 1991), (Diamond Jim) Brady is described as having routinely begun his day “with a hefty breakfast of eggs, breads, muffins, grits, pancakes, steaks, chops, fried potatoes, and pitchers of orange juice. He’d stave off mid-morning hunger by downing two or three dozen clams or oysters, then repair to Delmonico’s or Rector’s for a lunch that consisted of more oysters and clams, lobsters, crabs, a joint of beef, pie, and more orange juice.”

In midafternoon, allegedly, came a snack “of more seafood,” followed by dinner: “Three dozen oysters (the largest Lynnhavens were saved for him), a dozen crabs, six or seven lobsters, terrapin soup,” and a steak, with a dessert of “a tray full of pastries... and two pounds of bonbons.” Later in the evening, allegedly, came an après-theater supper of “a few game birds and more orange juice.”

>> No.18400498

>>18400482
As someone with gout I am mad jelly this fucker got away with such a diet.

>> No.18400518

>>18400498
not really:
>Brady died in his sleep on April 13, 1917, of a heart attack. (Although he died of a myocardial infarction, he also suffered from Bright's disease, coronary heart disease, diabetes mellitus, gallstones, arterial hypertension, inflammation of the prostate, as well as persistent, recurrent urinary tract infections). When his body was examined, doctors discovered that his stomach was six times the size of that of an average person.

>> No.18400520

>>18400498
His diet came back to bite his ass hard and he died at 60

Apparently his stomach can stretch 6 times more than the average person

>> No.18400545

>>18400520
Life expectancy for men back then was about 50 so he did pretty well, considering.

>> No.18400547

>>18400518
Haha. Oh dear. I’ll keep taking my allopurinol and go easy on the venison.

>> No.18400578

>>18400482
So eggs really are bad for you huh?

>> No.18400592

>>18400578
If you ate as much as he did then yeah

>> No.18401179

>>18398419
>chicken and leeks soup
sounds interesting

>> No.18401344

>>18399307
they were just used to people getting sick from shitty food and dying

>> No.18401366

>>18401344
People used to die from largely preventable/treatable conditions nowadays. Heart attack, high blood pressure, tuberculosis(they called it 'consumption'), etc.

>> No.18402351

>>18398419

>no tacos
>no hot sauce
>no burrito
>no tamales

HARD
PASS

>> No.18402396

>>18401179
The ole cock-a-leekie

>> No.18402471

>>18402396
sounds like an STD

>> No.18402476

>>18402396
This sounds like Southern-American Slang

>> No.18402480

>>18401366
Heart disease was almost unheard of until the early 1900s. Heart attacks/strokes were virtually never recounted in any medical or scientific documents.

>> No.18402497
File: 41 KB, 720x960, 1657436859967.jpg [View same] [iqdb] [saucenao] [google]
18402497

>>18398419
i'll have one of everything

>> No.18402572

>>18402480
>Heart disease was almost unheard of until the early 1900s
complete bullshit
why does everyone on this board just make shit up about ancient societies
>An article in the Lancet[1] in 2013 with whole body computed tomography (CT) scans of mummies from four different geographical regions (ancient Egypt, ancient Peru, Ancestral Puebloan of Southwest, and the Unangan of the Aleutian Islands) showed that atherosclerosis may be very ancient. The time period spanned more than 4000 years. The investigators found probable or definite atherosclerosis in 34% of the 137 mummies studied.

>“Shouldst though examine a patient with stomach disease suffering from pain in the arms, the breast, and on the side of the stomach, say: 'Death threatens.” And if though examinst a man for illness in his cardia, and he has pains in his arm, in his breast, and in side of his cardia, and it is said of him: It is [w3d] illness, then thou shalt say thereof: It is due to something entering the mouth it is death that threatens him. Thou shalt prepare for him: Stimulating herbal remedies…”[4]”

>> No.18402579

>>18398419
A pair of glasses so I could actually read this food index

>>18398458
blame grocery stores, some sell "delmonico steaks"

>> No.18402605
File: 60 KB, 960x960, just a normal bunch of bananas.jpg [View same] [iqdb] [saucenao] [google]
18402605

>>18398419
I mean everything on the menu is probably a cool choice but I can't believe nobody in 80+ replies has mentioned the banana. This is 1899. Before the extinction of the Gros Michel banana. Something that you will literally never have the opportunity to eat unless you go to Uganda.

I can save and buy some caviar or a nice roast but you best believe I'm not going to fucking Uganda.

>> No.18402616

>>18402572
Ah yes, the studies funded by (((Big Seed Oil))).
Nice, anon!

>> No.18402636

>>18402616
>gets owned
>starts spewing on about random bullshit
i accept your concession of defeat and your acceptance of being a lower form of being than I

>> No.18402644
File: 2.47 MB, 500x281, Baiting.gif [View same] [iqdb] [saucenao] [google]
18402644

>>18402636

>> No.18402693

>anime

>> No.18402807

>>18402572
>>18402616
>>18402636
Yeah but heart disease thousands of years ago was from being slaves building pyramids in the hot sun, or working 12 hour days in a factory 7 days a week for pennies and dying at 40 from stress. Modern heart disease is a new epidemic

>> No.18402829

>>18402807
Yep

>> No.18402862

>>18400482
Incredibly based

>> No.18402877
File: 79 KB, 785x510, king-of-the-hill-1.jpg [View same] [iqdb] [saucenao] [google]
18402877

>>18402829
Mmhmm

>> No.18402905

>>18398419
Shrimp Bisque
Roast Spring Lamb
Hashed Potatoes
Spaghetti Neapolitan
French Coffee and Ice Cream Meringue

>> No.18402919

>>18398419
Cup of Chicken Broth.

Spring lamb

Potatoes
Peas
Green Beans

Preserved apricots and rum sorbet. French Coffee.

A bottle of Red wine.

>> No.18402937

>>18399392
Dont mexicans eat ergot corn?

>> No.18403020
File: 19 KB, 306x306, 3D0D2C30-3BD5-4F27-BA38-08D8800A05FC.jpg [View same] [iqdb] [saucenao] [google]
18403020

>>18398487
>ignores anything he doesn’t understand
>selects “beef”, the least adventurous entree

Why are Americans absolute block heads when it comes to culinary appreciation?

>> No.18403051

>>18403020
nice newfag frog, but delmonicos was known for steak and beef dishes, ordering something else would honestly be a missed opportunity

>> No.18403171

>>18398419
Your menu is all fucked up. Why is "ready" a section? Just give me the oysters, since they're the first thing I saw.

>> No.18403222

>>18398487
What a mess of a menu. I wouldn't even know how to order.

>> No.18403715

>>18402937
Corn smut is not related to ergot in any way

>> No.18403749

>>18398953
some anons on here were arguing pigeon is disgusting one time, but I bet its great doctored up. Can't be much worse than any other bird

>> No.18403753

>>18398419
This scares and intimidates the flyover.

>> No.18403773 [DELETED] 
File: 3.21 MB, 4160x3120, 20220725_193911.jpg [View same] [iqdb] [saucenao] [google]
18403773

>>18398419
LOOK AT THAT ROAST LIST
GOD DAMN
SQAUB AND REED BIRDS IS ME ME ME MINE!
you cant get good sqaub anymore and you DEFINITELY should not eat birds found in reeds these days, too many parasites and they eat literal garbage
what have they done to my watershed bros

>> No.18403780 [DELETED] 
File: 208 KB, 1486x765, 20220701_151415_HDR~2.jpg [View same] [iqdb] [saucenao] [google]
18403780

>>18398503
softshell crab are called shedders, they molt their hardshell every few weeks, typically during a full moon. they are extremely soft, like a water balloon in texture, and can be handled safely. they are immensely flavorful, and can be eaten raw. like a seafood flavored jelly donut
i catch blue claw shedders every month i highly suggest thrm if you can get them fresh. good luck if you are on the east coast of the US though

>> No.18403941 [DELETED] 
File: 326 KB, 720x1560, Screenshot_20220928-090412.png [View same] [iqdb] [saucenao] [google]
18403941

>>18402605
back to Kuk Swamp then

>> No.18404157

Why is poultry like duck and chicken way more expensive than the beef and lamb?

>> No.18404179

>>18402807
Slaves weren't mummified you retard.

>>18402616
Ahh naturally, any information that doesn't agree with your preconceived assumptions based on nothing is a conspiracy made up by some corporation.

>> No.18404342
File: 670 KB, 496x749, file.png [View same] [iqdb] [saucenao] [google]
18404342

>>18403020
:^)

>> No.18404368

>>18403171
>>18403222
Fucking retards

>> No.18405283

>>18400466
Rich people food today is basically “put gold leaf or shaved truffles on top.” Also wagyu, lobster, fois gras and truffle on flatbread sounds like a pretty bad combination.

>> No.18405316

>>18405283
I might be missing something, but I don't even see lobster on the menu. Is this back when lobster was considered junk?

>> No.18405319

>>18398419
Are you supposed to pick something from each category? Like a 10 course meal of small plates? If so,
>soup: artichoke cream
>side: stuffed olives
>fish: Spanish mackerel
>ready: stuffed lamb shoulder
>entree: vol au vent
>roast: squab
>cold: escarole salad
>veg: fried eggplant
>entremet: bavoroise
>dessert: pistachio cream

>> No.18405653
File: 170 KB, 637x819, diamondjim1908jpg.jpg [View same] [iqdb] [saucenao] [google]
18405653

>>18398467
Based diamond jim

>> No.18405766

>>18404342
kek

>> No.18405870
File: 30 KB, 640x360, 1920s meme.jpg [View same] [iqdb] [saucenao] [google]
18405870

>>18405653

>> No.18405920

>>18404342
I spit out a bit of my drink

>> No.18406869
File: 390 KB, 645x1024, delmonico's 56 Beaver St 1888.jpg [View same] [iqdb] [saucenao] [google]
18406869

>>18398419
"One turtle to go, and make it snappy. My horse is double parked."

>> No.18406906

>>18398419
im getting chicken mayonnaise for 1.25 - which is probably like 80 bucks now

>> No.18406917

>>18398887
>Alum
That's baking powder.
>strychnine
Not an additive, but a pesticide. Same deal as today. Fundamentally unavoidable if you want to have a clean product.
>cocculus
Not a hallucinogen, just a wild berry species.
>iron sulphates
Likely leeched from barrel wood, not great but also not too concerning.
>copper sulphates
Herbicide and algae control. Still used to this day in swimming lakes. Once used as a medication. You'd have to eat a full pound of it a day to reach the lethal dose.
>lead chromate
Food coloring, though not legal anymore today there is no evidence to suggest that lead chromate is toxic or carcinogenic.
>ferrocyanide
Anti-caking agent, used in wine and citric acid production. Still used today.
>lime sulphate
Also known as gypsum, once used as a fertilizer and still used for soil pH control.
>copper carbonate
Once a food coloring, but toxic in high doses so it was abandoned.
>mercury bisulphate
Once used as a drug to induce vomiting, kinda doubt it was actually found in regular confectionaries.
>Venetian lead
Skin whitening cream. Not as an ingredient, just incidental contamination possibly from the person handling it.
>turmeric
Literally a spice.
>generic copper and lead fearmongering

Nice "journalism", chemicals with scary names oooooo, don't tell this guy what food colorings are made of nowadays, and what pesticide residues you can find on and in vegetables and fruit in the stores today!

>> No.18406935

>>18406917
>Not an additive
lol bullshit, strychnine was very specifically an additive used as a early 20th century PED
>Not a hallucinogen
seizures involve hallucinations and picrotoxin is a proconvulsant agent due to severe GABA antagonism
>there is no evidence to suggest that lead chromate is toxic or carcinogenic.
AHAHAHAH you are so full of shit even you likely couldn't type that with a straight face
https://nj.gov/health/eoh/rtkweb/documents/fs/1102.pdf
>Lead Chromate is a CARCINOGEN. HANDLE WITH EXTREME CAUTION

https://www.ncbi.nlm.nih.gov/pmc/articles/PMC4136752/
https://www.govinfo.gov/content/pkg/GOVPUB-C13-2af3d0210c05c7818ca2d7d2304df223/pdf/GOVPUB-C13-2af3d0210c05c7818ca2d7d2304df223.pdf
Lead chromate was investigated for its carcinogenic potential in both rats and mice
in a study performed at the Institute of Chemical Biology, University of San
Francisco [44] . Results show that this compound is a potent carcinogen in rats when
administered Intramuscularly (l.m.). Sixty four percent of the animals treated
developed malignant tumors at the injection site. Three renal carcinomas were also
found after i.m. treatment with lead chromate. Since lead powder is a comparatively
weak carcinogen in rats, whether given orally (p.o.) or i.m., the authors suggest
that the combination of lead and chromium (also a weak carcinogen) in lead chromate
accounts for the high carcinogenic activity of this compound in rats. Swiss albino
female mice could not tolerate the same high dose level as the rats. At the lower
dose administered to the mice, no tumors were detected. The mechanism of the action
of lead compounds as renal carinogens is unknown, but porphyrin metabolism is
disturbed.

>uhm actually, lead good go- I mean, guys
how hard have you huffed jenkem to consider lead something you need to defend on the internet lmfao look at this nigger doing it for free shilling LEAD on the internet

>> No.18406945
File: 125 KB, 325x270, 1663237306310502.png [View same] [iqdb] [saucenao] [google]
18406945

>>18406935
Lmao didn't read, seethe harder troon

>> No.18406947

>loses the argument
>doesn't just hide the thread and move on
why are tranime posters like this

>> No.18407711

>>18403051
'newfag frog' may be the most desperate shit i've heard someone new say

>> No.18407742

>>18407711
yeah really more of a twitchfag frog

>> No.18407791

>>18398419
where the fuck is the baked alaska? they invented the fucking thing 23 years prior.

>> No.18407896

>>18398419
The duck stands out to me

>> No.18408484

>>18398419
How the hell did they have such a huge menu with no freezing and no electric refrigeration?

>> No.18408487

>>18408484
Good question - I was wondering the same. It must be a huge restaurant.

>> No.18408537

>>18398419
>fried frostfish
Are you sure you didn't transport me across a few alternate realities while you were at it?

>> No.18408556

>>18398419
I would start an investment group.

>> No.18408599

>>18408484
>what is ice

>> No.18409124

>>18398419

>Soups - Chicken Gombo
>Roast - duckling and mallard duck
>cold - Terrine de foie gras and Beef a la mode
>Vegetables - Potatoes, hashed ad baked with cream

>> No.18409342

>>18398419

Imagine cranking out 60 of these menus on a typewriter every single goddamn day.

>> No.18409620

>>18398419
there's a hell of a lot that sounds really, really good
I wish there were still great restaurants with menus this large and freshly-printed

>> No.18409673

>>18409342
obviously done in a printing press ya numpty

>> No.18409686

The fuck is squab chicken?

>> No.18410519

>>18398419
roast mutton
3 servings
I have been fasting for 4 days for this

>> No.18410623

>>18399035
>pasteurization was known about but certainly not widespread even for things where it would've been most useful like dairy products
lmfao kill yourself

>> No.18411236

>>18398419
a gun so I can shoot myself.

>> No.18411276

>>18400126
If you're paying them a wage their not indentured.
Also the 13th amendment ban on slavery includes any bound term of service which includes indentured servitude.

>> No.18411284

>>18405870
Some humor really is timeless

>> No.18411289

>>18408484
The first commercial refrigerators were invented in the 1850s, Anon.

>> No.18411696

>>18409686
young chicken, weighing about 1lb

>> No.18411927

>>18398419
Leaving and going to McDonald's before I find a way to get back to 2022

>> No.18412704

>>18398419
>No caesar salad
>No Waldorf salad
>No cobb salad
>No Michigan salad
>No Pittsburgh salad
I'll just take a water, or do they not serve that either?

>> No.18412819

>>18412704
People weren't faggots back then

>> No.18413089

>>18398419
I'm telling them about the first world war

>> No.18413107

>>18398460
this, except all the dishes and ingredients
they probably all tasted different back then

>>
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