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666801 No.666801 [Reply] [Original]

To all the artists working for themselves (not in a studio or a company).

How good you are at marketing and selling your services and creations? You could be an amazing artist busting out phenomenal meshes/sculpts, fantastic textures, smooth animations but if you are not a business guy you will end up starving.
Name a few ways you are turning those polygons into cash.

Local market research?
Sites that sell 3D stuff?
Spamming your portfolio to companies and offering them your services?

>> No.666869

>>666801
It's important to market/network your stuff as much as possible. It's also important not to seem like some dude pushing your shit on everyone else.
I get a good chunk of my money from commissions, but another part of it is selling renders and stuff on places like Redbubble and similar. I haven't had much success with Patreon though. I'm sure others would have varying degrees of success.
I'm sure if you sold materials/textures and stuff there though, it would work pretty well. I just haven't found a good way to sell animations/renders there, as I can't figure out what decent benefits would go with it.

A good quick way to build up a following is to follow current trends, it's a bit like selling out, but you can slowly gradiate from the trendy stuff to something more your own as you build fans/followers. A quick jump from one to the other might be a bit jarring (unless your work is varied to begin with), but if you slowly transition people will become more familiar with it. It also keeps you from being a one-trick pony, which is bad with how markets evolve over time. Keep an email handy on anywhere you post, and keep a link to wherever you sell your stuff, and you'll get commissions and other shit where you can license your work.

I'm not going to say I'm rolling in the cash following this, but I've been growing steadily and that's important as an artist trying to live off their work.
I haven't tried it, but it *might* be worth moving into the irl side too and trying to contact galleries to host your work, or sell your stuff at local fairs on posters and stuff.

>> No.666871

I identify and give away samples to very high paying prospects. The sample goes with a letter that you me if you're looking for someone who is very critical about details, it's passionate and is willing to work crazy hours to get the job done.


I currently have 6 clients and my work consistently draws 6 figures.


One time I went to an even with a sample i planned to give away. It consisted of files on USB, a paper and 3D printed copy. My phone rang at 11pm that night. I was contracted by the end of the next day with the first deliverable pulling $175, 000.

These days I have multiple high net worth projects and don't work hard enough.

At the minimum "you don't catch big fish with an empty hook"

{Sorry for the lengthy post}

>> No.666872

>>666871
Archviz?

>> No.666932

>>666871
Thats either jewelry or archviz. Could you be more specific? Sounds amazing, I havent yet heard of such big price just for a single 3D sample.

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